Ancient Cereal

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zelph
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Ancient Cereal

Postby zelph » Fri Oct 31, 2008 3:42 pm

World's Oldest Cooked Cereal Was Instant
Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News e-mail share bookmark print

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Bulgar: It's What's For Breakfast | Discovery News Video: Archaeology Oct. 24, 2008 -- European diners around 8,000 years ago could enjoy a bowl of instant wheat cereal that, aside from uneven cooking and maybe a few extra lumps, wasn't very different from hot wheat cereals served today, suggests a new study that describes the world's oldest known cooked cereal.

Dating from between 5920 to 5730 B.C., the ancient cereal consisted of parboiled bulgur wheat that Early Neolithic Bulgarians could refresh in minutes with hot water.

"People boiled the grain, dried it, removed the bran and ground it into coarse particles," lead author Soultana-Maria Valamoti told Discovery News.

"In this form, the cereal grain can be stored throughout the year and consumed easily, even without boiling, by merely soaking in hot water," added Valamoti, an assistant professor of archaeology at Aristotle University of
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holyphenol
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby holyphenol » Tue Mar 24, 2009 8:07 pm

what's funny is that I have bulgur in my pantry(use it for tabbouleh) and I have never used it outdoors for some reason...

anyways, with some dried tomatoes and scallions, along with mint and/or parsley, lemon juice, and olive oil tabbouleh would be fairly easy to make - perfect for fuel saving also because the water doesn't need to come to a boil...
come to think of it, i don't know if the bulgur i have is par-boiled or not, which would knock off even more 'steeping' time...

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Ridgerunner
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby Ridgerunner » Tue Mar 24, 2009 10:28 pm

holyphenol wrote:what's funny is that I have bulgur in my pantry(use it for tabbouleh) and I have never used it outdoors for some reason...

anyways, with some dried tomatoes and scallions, along with mint and/or parsley, lemon juice, and olive oil tabbouleh would be fairly easy to make - perfect for fuel saving also because the water doesn't need to come to a boil...
come to think of it, i don't know if the bulgur i have is par-boiled or not, which would knock off even more 'steeping' time...


Welcomw holyphenol ! Glan to have you here ! :D Believe it or not, I have never tried Bulgar. I must make a point to test it out. ;)
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holyphenol
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby holyphenol » Wed Mar 25, 2009 2:10 pm

Welcomw holyphenol ! Glan to have you here !

I appreciate it.
I've been around just a little soft spoken perhaps.
It really is an interesting grain but it's nutritional values compared to brown rice, for instance, isn't as appropriate for hiking, so to say...
Either way, if you load on calories in other areas, it can be a hell of a lot easier to cook with...

Nutritional Facts for 1 cup of cooked bulgur

    Calories---151
    Calories from Fat---4

    % Daily Value*
    Total Fat ---0.44 g---0.7 %
    Saturated Fat ---0.08 g---0.4 %
    Cholesterol---0.00 mg---0.0 %
    Sodium ---9.10 mg---0.4 %
    Total Carbohydrate ---33.82 g---11.3 %
    Dietary Fiber ---8.19 g---32.8 %
    Sugars 0
    Protein---5.61 g---11.2 %
    Vitamin A--- 0.0 %
    Vitamin C--- 0.0 %
    Calcium--- 1.8 %
    Iron--- 9.7 %
    Niacin--- 9.1 %
    Vitamin E --- 0.2 %



Nutritional Facts for 1 cup of cooked medium grain brown rice

    Calories---218
    Calories from Fat---14

    % Daily Value*
    Total Fat ---1.62g---2.5%
    Saturated Fat ---0.32 g---1.6 %
    Cholesterol---0.00 mg---0.0 %
    Sodium ---1.95mg---0.1 %
    Total Carbohydrate ---45.84 g---15.3 %
    Dietary Fiber ---3.51 g---14.0 %
    Sugars 0
    Protein---4.52g---9.0 %
    Vitamin A--- 0.0 %
    Vitamin C--- 0.0 %
    Calcium--- 2.0 %
    Iron--- 5.7 %
    Niacin--- 13.0 %
    Vitamin E --- 0.0 %

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zelph
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby zelph » Wed Mar 25, 2009 2:44 pm

Thanks "holyphenol" for reintroducing this thread. Welcome!!!!
I had not tried this product yet but will try to get some locally so I can tast it. I like cracked wheat with honey for breakfast.

What is your recipe for tabbouleh, serving size= 4 cups

Wikipedia says: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgur

Bulgur for human consumption is usually sold parboiled, dried and de-branned. Bulgur is sometimes confused with cracked wheat, which is crushed wheat grain that has not been parboiled. Although traditionally de-branned, whole-grain, high-fiber bulgur and cracked wheat can be found in natural food stores. Bulgur is a common ingredient in Turkish, Middle Eastern, Indian and Mediterranean dishes. It has light, nutty flavor.

Bulgur can be used in pilafs, soups, bakery goods, or as stuffing. It is also a main ingredient in tabbouleh salad and kibbeh. Its high nutritional value makes it a good substitute for rice or couscous. In Indian cuisine, bulgur or daliya is also used as a cereal with milk and sugar.

In Turkey, it is prepared as pilaf in chicken stock, with or without sauteed noodles, or cooked with tomatoes, onions and red pepper. A variety of mezes and main dishes are also prepared with bulgur such as çiğ köfte, içli köfte, kısır and ezogelin soup. In Cyprus it is used to make koupes (also known as bulgur koftesi), a variety of kibbeh. It also forms the base of a soup, Tarhana, which is made with yogurt to which helim/halloumi has been added.
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holyphenol
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby holyphenol » Wed Mar 25, 2009 5:45 pm

Honestly, i don't really use a recipe for tabbouleh, simply because it is really simple an easy vessel for flavor. I use just enough lemon juice and mint for zing and a little oil to act a little binder. After that, I've been known to stray from the traditional by adding things like pine nuts or grapes(one of my favorites), which could be substitued with raisins or craisins...
A lot of the above ingredients can be found in togo packets or rationed easily...
Once again, it doesn't have as much caloric or fat value, but i'm sure it could be substituted for other grains for ease of use!
Actually, I plan on trying it as breakfast with both honey and sorghum - it sounds like a goood and easy idea - home kitchen included!!!
Thanks for the warm welcome!

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russb
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby russb » Wed Mar 25, 2009 6:16 pm

Another bulgur recipe:

bulgur
dried onion slivers
cajun seasoning
olive oil
soy sauce
cheddar cheese

bring to a boil bulgur, onion and seasoning. when cooked through, remove from pan and add oil to pan. brown bulgur mixture. add soy sauce and cheese chunks. ymmm

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zelph
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby zelph » Wed Mar 25, 2009 10:23 pm

We're going to eat bulgar in the morning :D I found a 28 oz. bag of it at the local grocery in the health food section. Bob's Red Mill brand. 100% whole grain. It has a recepe for tabbouleh.

Red Mill natural foods is out of Milwaukie, Oregon.

I'll try it without seasoning to see what it tastes like.
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holyphenol
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby holyphenol » Wed Mar 25, 2009 10:39 pm

I don't remember how much I paid for my bulgur, but I do know that I picked it up at an Indian grocer and Red Mill products are pretty expensive, at least they are here...
Either way, good luck with the grub!

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zelph
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Re: Ancient Cereal

Postby zelph » Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:51 am

I followed the directions, one cup bulgar, 2 cups cold water, bring to boil, simmer till tender. Waited for it to cool enough to eat, tasted it and it tastes like cracked wheat.

My next test will be to add boiling water to the grain and let set till water is absorbed and see what length of time it takes.

I use hard red wheat for cracked wheat cereal or whole grain wheat berry cereal which turns out crunchier. Not hard crunchy but chewy crunchy 8-)

P.S. I ate the entire 3 cups of cereal for breakfast. My daily requirement of fiber ;)

The next step is to incorporate seasonings and things and go exotic :lol:

Oh my!!! I'm off to the Italian deli to get some marinated sweet peppers as an ingredient. I recently was introduced to the tasty little things and love em. They are marinated in olive oil and have all kinds of delightful seasonings in the marinate.
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