Page 1 of 2

beyond primitive

Posted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 1:42 pm
by zelph

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 6:50 pm
by sudden
Brings myog sewing and stove building together at last.

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 8:53 pm
by zelph
He sure did a nice job on the entire machine. Nice job on the gears. tinny at minibull would be proud of his competition. ;)

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2012 9:20 am
by sudden
He should name it the Antikythera stove.

Image

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2012 10:08 am
by zelph
Very nice photo.

I had to look up that word :mrgreen:

Here is a page of photos:

https://www.google.com/search?q=antikyt ... 67&bih=844

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2012 11:01 am
by sudden
It was an amazing discovery and now they know how it worked.


Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2012 2:28 pm
by ConnieD
The reason I studied Johannes Kepler was because of the mechanisms for charting the planets of his era.

Not only does this mechanism have so many applications, there is one more I don't know how I know it. Is it Native American? Is it Old Caledonian?

There are ethnic people, who manage birth control and conception by the angle between the Sun and the Moon. The assertion is: you will conceive when the angle between the Sun and the Moon is the same as when you were born. Birth control is managed by avoiding that time by one day on either side, three days altogether in a month. Each day, is less likely, but birth control is achieved by avoiding three hours.

(If birth time is not well known, then a wider margin.)

In this manner, women managed to have birth control or conceive.

I have no reason to think this is false information. I also have never tested this information.

It may be native american, because my grandmother's grandmother was the head of The Gathered Women Clan.

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2012 7:11 pm
by zelph

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:19 am
by ConnieD
I think his machine was 1-degree "off" because he didn't take into account the erratic orbit of the Moon to the Earth, nor the eliptic orbit of the Earth to the Sun.

I wonder if when this man cut those cogs he got it right, or not. Maybe the angles of the cuts introduced the error.

I don't know that the artifact Antikythera had that problem. (I did not pay $32 for the article at the link.)

Johannes Kepler observed and did the math of elliptic orbits. It was his great discovery.

However, the Mayan Venus-cycle Calendar is so accurate, one would think they accounted for elliptic orbits.

Re: beyond primitive

Posted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:49 pm
by zelph
Makes me want to think hard and invent something :P