any one have any funny stove stories?

Post your new stove ideas here! All stoves welcome.
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stevebo
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Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby stevebo » Tue Aug 24, 2010 8:06 pm

Thanks Zelph for the info----------------just a thought, even though alcohol is considered a low energy fuel, (because it has around half the btus of gas or kerosene) it can still cause alot of damage. I read the other day that the Nazi V2 rocket used alcohol as its fuel. (if alcohol can boost a rocket into space, it can definitely blow up your kitchen!) So, even though its safer than white gas, alcohol isnt exactly fool proof. Ive blown up stoves in the kitchen, lit my hand on fire, etc etc more than once. (totally operator error!) Zelph, as a cottage industry, maker and seller of stoves etc, do you worry about liability? If someone buys one of your stoves, does something stupid and gets hurt, can they go after you? Whose responsible , the designer/manufacturer, or the operator? As an individual who may someday follow in your footsteps and put a stove or 2 on the market, that is a big concern for me. Any thoughts?

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zelph
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Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby zelph » Wed Aug 25, 2010 4:51 pm

stevebo wrote:Thanks Zelph for the info----------------just a thought, even though alcohol is considered a low energy fuel, (because it has around half the btus of gas or kerosene) it can still cause alot of damage. I read the other day that the Nazi V2 rocket used alcohol as its fuel. (if alcohol can boost a rocket into space, it can definitely blow up your kitchen!) So, even though its safer than white gas, alcohol isnt exactly fool proof. Ive blown up stoves in the kitchen, lit my hand on fire, etc etc more than once. (totally operator error!) Zelph, as a cottage industry, maker and seller of stoves etc, do you worry about liability? If someone buys one of your stoves, does something stupid and gets hurt, can they go after you? Whose responsible , the designer/manufacturer, or the operator? As an individual who may someday follow in your footsteps and put a stove or 2 on the market, that is a big concern for me. Any thoughts?


I don't worry about operator error or a stove blowing up. I've tested all my designs with fuels that people never heard of before to see if I could make them blow. Never had a failure.

If there was a problem with one of my stoves I could always say it was "BAD FUEL" :roll:

WHAT??????? There is one manufacturer that used that as an out. And many of his members followed right behind and agreed with the idea. It's a good thing there was one that had his head on straight ;) and told him what the real problem was. Nuff said on that fiasco ;)

More funny stuff from WB forum http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=15537

The Weasel 10-16-2006 09:52
Skydiver jumps out of the plane and pulls the ripcord. Damn! Nothing happens! He pulls the cord of his reserve 'chute...damn again! He looks down at the approaching ground and sees a speck ascending towards him. As it gets closer, he sees it's a guy with a typical backpacker, and he yells to him, "Do you know how to fix a broken parachute?" As he goes past, the backpacker yells back, "No! Can you fix an MSR stove?"

The Weasel

atraildreamer 10-21-2006 01:57
Pop...meow-r-r-r!!!...

When my pressurized stove blew apart, the top half nearly landed on the cat. I didn't think a 14 year old tabby could still move that fast! :eek:

Big Dawg 10-21-2006 05:35
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Weasel (Post 256733)
Skydiver jumps out of the plane and pulls the ripcord. Damn! Nothing happens! He pulls the cord of his reserve 'chute...damn again! He looks down at the approaching ground and sees a speck ascending towards him. As it gets closer, he sees it's a guy with a typical backpacker, and he yells to him, "Do you know how to fix a broken parachute?" As he goes past, the backpacker yells back, "No! Can you fix an MSR stove?"

The Weasel
Excellent!!!!! LOL!!!!

zelph 11-09-2006 21:47
happens to the best of us

this is a classic!!!!!!!! This is all that remains of Hanna's little accident.
Friday, June 23, 2006

This belongs with the etc. part of this thread.

LostInSpace 11-09-2006 21:59
I 'spose a stove is the wrong way to warm a container of hooch. :D

Gaiter 11-10-2006 01:43
Quote:
Originally Posted by zelph (Post 269158)
this is a classic!!!!!!!! This is all that remains of Hanna's little accident.
Friday, June 23, 2006

This belongs with the etc. part of this thread.
LOL yep i did that!!! except mine didn't involve an exploding stove, it involved me pouring alcohol, thinking it was water, over an already lit stove. Great way to get rid of leg hair for a while, and i hope the church group that was at that shelter that night wasn't too offended by my choice of words.

Two Speed 11-10-2006 01:47
Quote:
. . . i hope the church group that was at that shelter that night wasn't too offended by my choice of words.
Given the fancy footwork that usually accompanies such "colorful" incidents I'm sure they thought it was part of the floor show. Don't sweat it.

Gaiter 11-10-2006 01:57
lil'red kept on telling me to drop and roll, but given that it was mostly on the inside of my leg, i was afraid if i did that, it would have gotten on both legs. so i kept on dancing until it i got it out.

I really need to sleep now, nighty night!

smirkinman 11-13-2006 21:14
Why they pop

Regarding the pops reported using some alcohol stoves, I understand the problem is alowing air and/or the flame front to migrate into the confined space of the stove. I remember a safety film I saw once where a metal gas can was fitted with a metal spout that had a stainless steel screen over it. They lit the spout and had a nice little flame but no big boom. I think there may have been an example of what happens without the screen, but I can't be sure.

On the stoves, notice that all the pops and outright explosions are reported when using a stove with a hole that has a large-ish diameter. The penny stove instructions I read said that if you drill three to six 1/16 inch holes in the center rather than one 1/4 in hole, you will reduce/prevent the explosions.

It seems to me that there will be air and alcohol inside the stove from time to time. The trick is to keep the fire from getting in there with it. (Of course) and small holes seem to do that. Anyone have an explanation as to why a screen keeps the fire out?

smirkinman 11-13-2006 21:24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeker (Post 210268)
i think the whole pressurized thing is mostly about trying to get alcohol to cook something as fast as a white gas stove. i'm not in that big a hurry in the woods.
Actually, it's not all about hurry. The challenge is to put the heat into your supper faster than the surrounding environment sucks it back out. Once stated in that way, you can see there are more than one approach that will improve your results - reduce the rate of heat loss, or increase the rate of heat gain. Or both. For my money, the challenge is to boil my water with as little fuel as possible, so I can carry less fuel. Too cool a burn and you have to burn longer to get temp if you even make it. Which means more fuel. Too hot a burn and the heat goes around the pot and never makes it into the water. Which means more fuel. So one has to match ones pot, stove, stand, screen etc. to one another. It's a system, and the parts gotta get along. That's why a lid helps so much, and also why JetBoil has a built in cozy.

Skidsteer 11-13-2006 21:36
Quote:
Originally Posted by smirkinman (Post 270747)
...So one has to match ones pot, stove, stand, screen etc. to one another. It's a system, and the parts gotta get along....
So what's your system? Lay it out for me. Got pics?

I'm sincerely interested.

zelph 11-14-2006 10:36
If i lay a fine stainless steel screen over the top of a StarLyte burner it won't lite. The screen does not allow oxygen into the gas can just as small holes in the Penny stove. I think some have experience small audio pops when the metal heats and expands, mostly the bottom of the can is under tension due to manufacturing of the can. The initial heating of the can eliminates the tension with an audible "pop" I think there were a couple of posts saying that it (pop) and movement of only occured once.

zelph 01-25-2007 16:48
what happen to

http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...5&postcount=28


Quote:
ontheroad2long
hi there what do u guy do with all they stove i try too make one and all most burn my pack my test and house if any got a free or cheep om let me know please
Wonder whatever happen to this guy, maybe he tried to make another stove and something went wrong. This is just an update and reminder to be careful when playing with fire and building stoves.

Anyone heard of any misshaps lately?

atraildreamer 01-25-2007 18:26
O-o-o-p-s...

Had a pressurized stove blow apart in the kitchen sink during a test. The flame blew out as the top half of the stove went straight up, bounced off the ceiling and nearly landed on the cat, scaring the crap out of the both of us! :eek:

(You should have seen the old girl move! :jump)

Jim Adams 01-25-2007 18:46
and you all still insist on using them?!!!!!!!!!!
get light weight and go cannister!
geek

Jack Tarlin 01-25-2007 18:52
I agree that most stove blow-ups or meltdowns can be attributed to pilot error, or more likely, one moment of in-attention or carelessness.

A favorite memory: Back around the year 2000, I saw this guy cooking dinner on top of Springer Mountain; he had an obviously brand-new Whisperlite. As I watched him, he must have pumped the thing around 45 times, basically till he couldn't pump it any more.

I VERY politely tried to intervene by telling him it was probably sufficiently pressurized. His reply was something like: "I understand you've hiked this Trail before, but you're not the only one out here with experience in the woods. If I need your help with anything I'll ask for it."

I smiled, and said "Sure!" and then backed up around 15 feet.

He over-primed the stove, flicked a lighter, and the flame that shot up almost took off his eyebrows. His hair wasn't quite on fire, but it was real close.

His stove was basically destroyed; the entire pump fixture was a melted glob of red plastic.

I quickly determined that other than the singed hair he was OK, and happily was uninjured.

I then told him that in future, I would certainly defer to his previous knowledge and experience and if I ever saw him do something similarly stupid, I'd be sure to say nothing.

And with that, I said "Have a good dinner!" and headed towards my tent.

Most stove accidents are NOT the fault of the stove.

sweetpeastu 01-25-2007 20:34
I have one of those Whisperlite things. I'm half scared of it everytime I use it....it seems tempermental. I get visions in my head of fireballs and exploding fuel canisters. I think campfires are safter--unless there's a burn ban.

Jack Tarlin 01-25-2007 20:44
Not to worry! I had a Whisperlite Internationale for years, in fact I still have it stored away somewhere.

It's got close to 10,000 miles on it, and who knows how many meals.

If properly used, maintained, and cared for, you have nothing to fear from an MSR stove.

They make great stuff.

terrapin_too 01-25-2007 21:10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Tarlin (Post 310103)
If properly used, maintained, and cared for, you have nothing to fear from an MSR stove.
I hate having to agree with JT about anything, but it needs to be noted, on this one instance. I feel pretty much the same way about my Whisperlite stove, and it's about as old as Jack's. The Whisperlite has earned its place in thru-hikin' history, along with the Svea and the Coleman Peak-1. ;)

sweetpeastu 01-25-2007 23:05
thats the catch though, "if used properly and properly maintained" lol. Any advice for me on the proper maintenance....and um well the use is done by instinct soooo....any tips there are welcome too!
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

stevebo
Posts: 74
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Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby stevebo » Wed Aug 25, 2010 10:47 pm

Zelph, youve got me curious -------------what did you mean by "WHAT??????? There is one manufacturer that used that as an out. And many of his members followed right behind and agreed with the idea. It's a good thing there was one that had his head on straight and told him what the real problem was. Nuff said on that fiasco ' ??????? Just wondering................. :?

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zelph
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Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby zelph » Wed Aug 25, 2010 10:52 pm

stevebo wrote:Zelph, youve got me curious -------------what did you mean by "WHAT??????? There is one manufacturer that used that as an out. And many of his members followed right behind and agreed with the idea. It's a good thing there was one that had his head on straight and told him what the real problem was. Nuff said on that fiasco ' ??????? Just wondering................. :?


Read thru this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1264
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

stevebo
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Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby stevebo » Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:26 am

Thanks Zelph! that makes more sense. Very interesting!

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zelph
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Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby zelph » Sat Aug 28, 2010 12:03 pm

terrapin_too 01-25-2007 23:17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetpeastu (Post 310230)
thats the catch though, "if used properly and properly maintained" lol. Any advice for me on the proper maintenance....and um well the use is done by instinct soooo....any tips there are welcome too!

Whisperlite usage? Prime it. Let the primer flame die out completely. Then open the valve and light the sucker. If it's been primed properly, you will hear a hiss of gas when you open the valve. That means it's good to go. Act quickly between the end of the priming and the lighting of the stove, but make sure the sound you hear is the hiss of gas.

If it hasn't been primed properly, you'll get liquid gas, which is no good. In that case: close the valve, re-prime, and try again. The main cause of clogging is trying to use the stove without a good prime.

If the stove acts balky, use a strand of wire (or the tool from the maintenance kit) to clean out the jet. With the newer "shaker" models you clean the jet simply from shaking the stove properly. Don't over-pump the thing. It really doesn't need much pumping, at all.

sweetpeastu 01-25-2007 23:29
thanks for the advice! I think when I have issues it comes from lack of good timing with the priming. Sometimes it works fine, other times I get too much gas in the little ....pan or whatever and then I have to wait forever for the flame to die down...etc. I should prolly just use it more. lol.

terrapin_too 01-26-2007 00:05
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetpeastu (Post 310237)
thanks for the advice! I think when I have issues it comes from lack of good timing with the priming. Sometimes it works fine, other times I get too much gas in the little ....pan or whatever and then I have to wait forever for the flame to die down...etc. I should prolly just use it more. lol.
Yeah, you need to be consistent with the priming. Always let the priming flame die out completely before trying to light it "normal" mode. Act quickly between the end of priming and lighting the stove. Listen for that hiss.

You might also just lay down a couple of sheets of newspaper on a table, and disassemble the stove just for kicks. The burner unit, not necessarily the pump. I'm quite serious. It's a good exercise, and may make you feel more comfortable with the stove. It's dead simple. Anyway, that's what an engineer would do. ;)

fonsie 01-26-2007 03:19
Yea I had a pepsi stove blow up.....Now I own a Vargo titanium alchohul stove. Yea and it has'nt blown up yet, and it weighs less than a ounce.

bubba295 01-29-2007 13:01
I have never had a Pepsi Stove blow up.....and I hope I don't. I don't use the pressurized type though.

oldcoot 01-29-2007 19:55
whisperlight failures

I own, and have owned, for more than a few years, with no problems, a very dependable whisperlight internationale. That being said, there are two very rare failure points on the whisperlights. If the stove is more than a year or so old and has the second generation pump on it, it can fail at the point where the pump handle fastens into the rest of the pump. Fatigue and/or over zealous pumping causes the plastic "nubs" that retain the handle to break. (those little things you have to do the quarter turn to disengage if the leather cup needs oiling). Not a terrible problem if the check valve is in good working order, otherwise the handle comes out gas leaks and uh! oh! The worse of the two problems is again a fatigue and/or over zealous pumping problem, the pump at the point it screws into the bottle next to the o-ring will crack/break giving the o-ring nothing to push against. This allows gas to leak rather rapidly with spectacular results. I suspect this is what Jack witnessed. MSR has dealt with both these problems on their new pumps by using a fuller/beefier rubber piece next to the bottle and a design that does away with the weak "nubs" on the handle end. Just inspect the pump every now and then and don't try to get a 100 PSI into the bottle with it and you got nothing to worry about.

sweetpeastu 01-30-2007 00:40
so how many times are u supposed to pump it...safetly? (I think mine is the newer kind with the beefier rubber piece)

oldcoot 01-30-2007 06:38
proper number of pumps

Short answer, who knows? Long answer, it depends on bottle size, how full the bottle is, and to some extent outdoor temps (my opinion only on this one). The bigger the bottle the bigger the air space in it if it is filled to the correct line on the side, and the emptier the bottle the bigger the air space. The bigger the air space the more pumps it takes to compress the air inside to a given pressure. In the end sometimes less is more, I find I can get the whisperlights to do a fair job of simmering if I keep the pressure on the low side. A weak yellow flame, pump some more, a nice blue hissing flame OK no more pumping, a big tall yellow flame, see above posting and run like hell. Light it up, experiment, have some fun, if they were really dangerous they wouldn't be able to sell them now would they?

oldfivetango 01-30-2007 07:23
I put my beautiful brass SVEA 123R aside for alcohol
only because of the weight and partly because I felt
a little uneasy with the pyrotechnics involved with
starting it.Plus,although it is simple in its design it is
still a mechanical device and, as such, is not immune to
failure.Alcohol,being so much lighter and simpler is my
current choice but requires a little more systems management
in its use.The size of the pot and the fit of the windscreen etc
are all an intergral part of the mix as someone stated earlier.
I took some advice from SGT Rock awhile back and made a simple
burner out of a can of Frito Lay Bean Dip.In a matter of minutes I
punched holes with a push pin,sat the stove in a small primer pan
left over from a worthless (imho) stove I had purchased and was
cooking in short order.Maybe I should say boiling in short order instead
of cooking.For cooking I use the Brasslite Turbo 2D and it is a Champion
of a stove from my perspective.I do not use the base reflector that I
sometimes see others using since I am using my little primer pan on
BOTH stoves.The little primer pan add a great deal of stability to either
setup and makes lighting the stove real easy and more than a little
safer as one doesnt necessarily have to hunker down over the stove to
light it.So the question is-what is that reflector ring actully do?When I
tried it all I got was a fuel flash so I discontinued its use.
Thanks,
Oldfivetango

zelph 02-04-2007 20:09
Quote:
--1996--
Join Date: 03-13-2004
Location: North, Georgia
Year of thru-hiked: 1996
Posts: 1,633

When I thru hiked in 96 a lot of the hikers using various alcohol stoves had trouble boiling water in the cold windy environment along with the near freezing creek water. One of the guys even got burned pretty bad using a less than sturdy homemade one.

Came across the above info posted by Ridge not to long ago. Just a reminder to be careful.

Peaks 02-05-2007 08:30
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldcoot (Post 312562)
I own, and have owned, for more than a few years, with no problems, a very dependable whisperlight internationale. That being said, there are two very rare failure points on the whisperlights. If the stove is more than a year or so old and has the second generation pump on it, it can fail at the point where the pump handle fastens into the rest of the pump. Fatigue and/or over zealous pumping causes the plastic "nubs" that retain the handle to break. (those little things you have to do the quarter turn to disengage if the leather cup needs oiling). Not a terrible problem if the check valve is in good working order, otherwise the handle comes out gas leaks and uh! oh! The worse of the two problems is again a fatigue and/or over zealous pumping problem, the pump at the point it screws into the bottle next to the o-ring will crack/break giving the o-ring nothing to push against. This allows gas to leak rather rapidly with spectacular results. I suspect this is what Jack witnessed. MSR has dealt with both these problems on their new pumps by using a fuller/beefier rubber piece next to the bottle and a design that does away with the weak "nubs" on the handle end. Just inspect the pump every now and then and don't try to get a 100 PSI into the bottle with it and you got nothing to worry about.

Yes, I've had those problems with the MSR pump. However, thanks to the liberal exchange policy at EMS and REI, I have exchanged them for the new pump at no cost.

atraildreamer 02-26-2007 12:21
Origin?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Tarlin (Post 310014)
He over-primed the stove, flicked a lighter, and the flame that shot up almost took off his eyebrows. His hair wasn't quite on fire, but it was real close.
Is this how a mountain top becomes a "bald"? :-?

zelph 03-19-2007 16:00
comes under etc.

This is just a reminder to be careful when experimenting at home in the kitchen. Don't mix fuels and firestarting products. Notice that gun powder was mixed in with shavings, oh my!!!!!

Quote:
03-14-2007, 16:30
No Belay
Savoring Happy!
Magnesium Fire Maelstrom
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Was on Whee-bay a couple of weeks ago and saw a listing for magnesium shavings to use as fire starters. Thought "this has got to be cool" and bought a pound. I was expecting a sandwich bag full but when it got here, I was surprised to see it was a gallon zip-lock full of saw shavings and little fuzzy balls coated in gun powder. Thought "this really is cool."
My girlfriend was using the stove so I couldn't try it under the exhaust fan where I usually do my Alky stove training. Instead I got a coffee can, bad choice, turned it over, and poured about a tablespoon of the shavings over one of the fuzzy balls that I set on the bottom of the inverted can. Expecting a nice subtle tinder drying type fire, I struck a match to the fuzzy ball. It initially just kind of smoldered but then a small shaving of the magnesium ignited and that's the last thing I remember seeing before the big flash. Have you ever heard 6 smoke alarms going off at the same time?
Anywho, as my vision began to come back, I was pleased to see there was very little flame left on the top of the coffee can, just allot of smoke. Then I realized the magnesium had burned through the can and was now devouring the top of my kitchen island cabinet. Being a cool headed experimenter, I grabbed an oven mitt and the turkey roaster pan. In total control, I knocked the can off onto the floor and as I wiped the burning magnesium off the counter and towards the roaster pan, there was another blinding flash. Kinda looked like the 4th of July, New Years Eve in New York, and Hiroshima all rolled into one. Thank God, somewhere between the counter top and the pan, the remaining metal from hell had ignited and disappeared. All that remained were little black shards stuck in my forehead, arms, and stomach. The underarmor T I was wearing had been reduced to a Richard Simons look alike. Didn't get lucky that night...in fact didn't even get dinner.


http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...51&postcount=1

zelph 03-31-2007 09:55
pop can stoves

I think this one is worthy of this thread:
Quote:
IdahoDavid
Rather than creating a smaller hole, I have punched four 1/8 inch holes in the center for fill. The only problme I had was when I got impatient and refilled the stove before it had cooled completely so I had premature faborization and it blew up inside the chamber when I tried to light it. Very exciting. :eek:
His post can be viewed here (pepsi can cut out size)

Hole size in pop can stoves can be important!!!!

Bohican 03-31-2007 13:56
2 Attachment(s)
This isn't about problems with MYOG stoves, but what can happen when "improvements" are made to a production stove.

I got a really good deal on a Vargo Titanium, but I'm using a Heinie Keg as a pot. The problem is the pot stand portion is too small for the keg. I decided to use another Heinie can as a combination windscreen/ pot holder.

Attachment 1652

It was a little too efficient at keeping the heat under the pot, and caused the alcohol to vaporize at an alarming rate.

Attachment 1653

Luckily, wasted fuel was the only bad thing that happened. I've since made a better adapter for the Heinie with this stove, but I ran across the idea of using a bottle cap and some fuel to "prime" the stove. So, I filled the bottle cap with fuel, placed it under the full stove, lit the alcohol in the cap, set the stove on the flaming cap, and within 10 seconds had the vargo erupting balls flame all over the electric range it was set on. No pics, as I was in a hurry to dig out a stock pot to smother the blaze before I lit my apartment complex on fire. I now test "improvements" to my stove outdoors.

I now seem to recall that little bit of advice being included in the vargo instructions (ETA: The Outside part). :o

rjprince 03-31-2007 15:02
Pretty sure there is no way to make the FireLightStove blow up. I have burned all kinds of fuel in it and have melted a few, white gas, naptha, diesel, kerosene. THESE ARE NOT APPROVED FUELS FOR THE FIRELIGHT, just some things I tried on a crazy afternoon. (ONLY USE DENATURED ALCOHOL OR AN EQUIVALENT in the FireLightStove) In any case, with my design there is no way to build up pressure since the inner and outer walls of the burner are touching each other.

zelph 03-31-2007 15:20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjprince (Post 347424)
Pretty sure there is no way to make the FireLightStove blow up. I.
Somewhere in this thread there is a post saying that your type of burner tipped over and flaming fuel was spilled. It was an open flame type just like yours.

Some stoves are more scary than others. We should be careful with all stoves. Some stoves can tip over and the fuel wont spill out, less scary.

Would you like to add an experience that might be of some value to this thread, something that went wrong during the 5 gallons of fuel that you burned 1/2 ounce at a time. The hundreds of stoves that you made, did any of them fail in any way?

Thank You

rjprince 03-31-2007 17:45
Oh, absolutely. Fire does burn things, no doubt. I do not know of any alcohol stove that will not spill some fuel when turn over while in operation. If the fuel spills, then the fire spreads where the fuel goes. This is true with the Trangia as well. Kinda tend to believe that any liquid fuel stove could have this potential. Have not tried to turn over my white gas stove while in operation, but pretty sure that it would be unpleasant. AND water does not put out a petroleum fire like it DOES a small alcohol fire...

In my instructions, I specifically warn, "If you turn this stove over while in operation, the fire will be out of the stove and onto whatever surface the stove was at the time..."

In another place I warn, "knives and sharp edges can cut... fire burns things". In that sense stoves can be like people. Their greatest strengths can become their greatest weakness, if they are not kept under control...

If a person is a strong leader with a forceful personality, it is potentially a very good thing. If that person uses that strength to dominate and hurt others, it is a bad thing. Strength out of control = weakness.

SO yes, any stove which has the potential to allow the fire to get out of control has a weakness. Ever drop a kitchen towel onto a red hot electric burner? Anything that will cook food has a weakness. Its strength is its ability to generate heat. It weakness is it ability to generate heat. Strength must be kept under control.

Do you agree?

rjprince 03-31-2007 17:51
Some of the stoves burped and sputtered out small droplets of fuel when burning. As long as I was on a non-flamable surface this was OK. Final design does not have this problem and the windscreen/shield would take care of it if it did.

As far as a problem in burning all that fuel (I am on my 8th gallon now), only time was when I got careless and added fuel to a burner that had not gone completely out. The fumes in the plastic bottle ignited and forced burning fuel out with great intensity! Did not burn down the house or damage the stove. Did result in immediate increase in heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration. But for the potential danger, kinda reminded me of the time when I was a kid and accidently dropped a lit match into a coffee can full of firecrackers, only this was much more quiet....

Ray

Minot 04-01-2007 10:18
I just picked up a Vargo and I am very disappointed in it.

It sputters and leaks around the edge. I didn't overfill it but it still burned off the fuel too quickly.

It's a marginal design in my opinion. I know some people have had great times with them, but it's not going in my pack.
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

coolingrazor424
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Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby coolingrazor424 » Mon Oct 17, 2016 4:51 am

very funny DarenN :D

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zelph
Posts: 15743
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: any one have any funny stove stories?

Postby zelph » Mon Oct 17, 2016 6:16 pm

well; it wasn't funny untill after the fires were out. i had to run faster than i like to. :lol:
to test alternative fuels i built a Pepsi-G with few, and small, jets. it worked well enough with alcohol so i moved on to some alternatives. i tried a few things that worked, but were very sooty/smokey. i wasn't done though cause i had a gascan for the lawnmower thay had unleaded gasoline in it. 3/4 fl oz of fuel and a match started the fun. it lit and bloomed very quickly, and i was delighted! but then things started to go south, out on my concrete patio. the burner started roaring louder than i had ever heard a burner roar. i decided it might be prudent to back off a ways. like, ten feet. ;) then, with a BANG the stove exlpoded. spraying burning gasoline in a six foot radius. on fire were, my lawn, house, park bench, and the posts that support the second floor deck. guess where my extinguiser was. yep. second floor kitchen. up the stairs, grab the F/E, down the stairs, run around like an idiot, putting out fires. i wasn't bothering with fires on the concrete, so naturaly, i lit my shoes on fire. put out the shoe fires, and finished getting the rest of them out. i then got a beer and sat down to watch the area for a while to make sure nothing would flare up. the hilarity of the situation suddenly hit me, and i started laughing like a mad fool! :lol:
the lawn grew back all by itself. the house and posts needed a bit of scraping and paint and they were fine. the park bench took some sanding and varnish and it was better than new. the shoes had rubber soles so they didn't survive.
if learned anything from this it is to pay attention to those who know when they say things like, "don't even try to burn anything but alcohol!" :lol:

Daren........


That's funny :D
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/


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