I.V. Stove

Post your new stove ideas here! All stoves welcome.
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dlarson
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by dlarson » Thu Nov 20, 2008 12:04 am

Daren, I'm not giving up. I'm just very black and white with the way I look at things. ;) Here are the specifics: The valve does not seem to have an off state. Even with the screw threaded all the way in there was still enough space somewhere for the fuel to get through. The burner was flooded with two ounces of alcohol. The cookie sheet was under the counter on the shelf. Its sidewall makes it difficult to get a good view of the stove with the camera so I made a poor decision not to use it. I moved the camera before you could see but I did put water on the fire. My mistake was trying to grab the fuel bag first so it didn't just keep feeding the fire. I'm not too worried about it though. I learned my lesson and the counter top was/is horrible because someone painted it with latex paint. :roll: The wife still hasn't noticed but I doubt she'll mind anyways. :D

Ridgerunner, that's exactly what my plan is regarding the valve. I saw this shut-off valve online and that might work. My concern is that it will be either on or off with no middle. I was originally looking for some type of needle valve. It seems that needle valves are often mounted in the engine so they don't have the "casing" I need.
"Hiking is just walking where it's O.K. to pee." -Demetri Martin

irrationalsolutions
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by irrationalsolutions » Thu Nov 20, 2008 12:20 am

what if you tried some kind of a ball valve. they are harder to control flow rate but with the bag hanging it seems like you would want a simple on/off. as long as the bag is up i would think it would keep flowing. just turn it on for a few seconds fill up and turn off. thinking about it for a slow drip you would almost have to have a closed system. i could be wrong but its worth thinking about.
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oops56
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by oops56 » Thu Nov 20, 2008 7:26 am

irrationalsolutions wrote:what if you tried some kind of a ball valve. they are harder to control flow rate but with the bag hanging it seems like you would want a simple on/off. as long as the bag is up i would think it would keep flowing. just turn it on for a few seconds fill up and turn off. thinking about it for a slow drip you would almost have to have a closed system. i could be wrong but its worth thinking about.
Ues your vavle after the vavle put some cotton in the line help it to slow down
Man play with fire man get burnt

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dlarson
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by dlarson » Thu Nov 20, 2008 11:22 am

irrationalsolutions wrote:what if you tried some kind of a ball valve. they are harder to control flow rate but with the bag hanging it seems like you would want a simple on/off. as long as the bag is up i would think it would keep flowing. just turn it on for a few seconds fill up and turn off. thinking about it for a slow drip you would almost have to have a closed system. i could be wrong but its worth thinking about.
On of my design goals with this stove was to eliminate the "add fuel, wait, add more" process. Another design goal was to incorporate some sort of burn rate control. I thought that regulating the fuel flow would achieve that. Basically, I am trying to make an alcohol stove that behaves more like a canister stove.

I've planned a completely new design for this stove. I have come to realize that the burner, as nice as it is, does not fit the design criteria. The burner body is too large and the fiberglass stuffing inhibits immediate flame control. The effects of regulating the fuel flow are extremely delayed by the extra fuel held by the stuffing and the large volume of the burner.

I have another test video which I have not put online. The video is test #1 and I put a little more than .5 US fl oz of fuel in the fuel bag. There was really no need for the fuel bag because I know from previous tests that the burner can hold that amount of fuel. I also know that the burner will run for about 10 minutes on that amount of fuel. With all that in mind, if the burner is holding .5 ounces of fuel and I turn down or stop the flow of fuel the effect will not be noticed for 10 minutes.
oops56 wrote:Use your valve. After the valve put some cotton in the line to help it to slow down.
Oops, that's a very good idea and I'll keep it in mind. I'm still going to change the valve but it might just be the trick I need further down the road. Thanks.
"Hiking is just walking where it's O.K. to pee." -Demetri Martin

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zelph
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by zelph » Thu Nov 20, 2008 11:52 am

Use a basketball/football filling air needle thingy on the end of a tube that comes from the bag. Diameter of jet holes control basic flow of fuel. Pressure increases flow rate. Squeeze the bag to increase flow rate. Lay the bag down to decrease flow rate. ???
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

DaddyMnM
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by DaddyMnM » Thu Nov 20, 2008 9:57 pm

I was in the grocery store yesterday and I noticed that some ketchup and mustard bottles have twist tops. Looks like they might make a good valve if you can think of a good way to connect the hose. Fuel might not flow without a squeeze due to air lock though.

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zelph
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by zelph » Thu Nov 20, 2008 11:19 pm

DaddyMnM wrote:I was in the grocery store yesterday and I noticed that some ketchup and mustard bottles have twist tops. Looks like they might make a good valve if you can think of a good way to connect the hose. Fuel might not flow without a squeeze due to air lock though.
It would be good if an air lock could be relied on. Add a simple air intake on the other end of the container or on it's side. Open to allow air in. Might work!!!
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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dlarson
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by dlarson » Fri Nov 21, 2008 1:54 pm

zelph wrote:
DaddyMnM wrote:I was in the grocery store yesterday and I noticed that some ketchup and mustard bottles have twist tops. Looks like they might make a good valve if you can think of a good way to connect the hose. Fuel might not flow without a squeeze due to air lock though.
It would be good if an air lock could be relied on. Add a simple air intake on the other end of the container or on it's side. Open to allow air in. Might work!!!

The first remote stove I built was this summer during the 4th of July. The fuel was held in a bottle through vacuum pressure. When the fuel level in the burner dropped low enough more fuel would be released into the burner. Then it would stop delivering fuel when a vacuum seal was once again achieved from a higher fuel level in the burner. The result was huge flames 5 or so inches from the burner. It gobbled the fuel up until the container was empty. At that point the stove began to function as a normal jet stove would with a more controlled flame. I realized from the test that the missing component was a flow control valve for the fuel.

There are 4 pictures here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/epilektric ... 516677444/

Image
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zelph
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by zelph » Sat Nov 22, 2008 7:55 pm

You've progressed well since the fourth :D

soon you'll have one to put into the stove of the month ;)
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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DarenN
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Re: I.V. Stove

Post by DarenN » Mon Nov 24, 2008 11:04 pm

i lit a modified supercat 45 minutes ago and it's still boiling a pot of water on my counter.
all i did to the burner was shove a piece of 1/4" od tubing through one of the lower holes.
i hooked this up to a plastic water bottle with the cap modified to allow for an air-lock free fuel feed. this is still way over built. heavey and bulky. but i've proved the tech. (50 minutes now)

edit: 75 minutes till the fuel ran out.
by very careful fuel feed control i was able to attain a simmer just by limiting the drip rate.

Daren........
"I'd rather be happy than right." Slartibartfast

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