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Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 10:27 pm
by DarenN
Jon. thanks for the excelent video! very inciteful. i never even thought of the heat transfer with light aluminum cans as being a possible problem. (i had made my Zenstoves Cyclones from beer cans).

so i dug through my pile of old stoves and found one of my old cyclones, straightenned out some dents, and fired it up, and what do you know! it actually did cyclone for a few seconds before it changed to just an alcohol fire in a mashed up can.

Daren.........

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:03 pm
by zelph
A well made video Jon, thanks!!!!

It shows clearly the difference in the two designs, both being able to passively produce the vortex. JRB's vortex disappears when a pot is placed on the stove from what I can see. The concentrating swirl disappears and the flames go outward and up as in an ordinary open flame stove.(some being better than others ;) )

Your design coupled with the proper incorporated pot support seems to be more adaptive to our needs. You're on the right track :D I like the idea of tangential spacing the holes to create the vortex....totally cool!!!!

Look forward to your advancement of this design. :D

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:43 pm
by Vibe
So what would be the result of placing a Starlyte stove in the bottom of a vortex generating can? This could limit the "Blooming into a simple chimney" effect.Rather than starting with round holes for vents and then "tangentializing them - start with vertical slits and expand those into tangential ports.

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:28 pm
by realityguy
Okay..I'm looking for the proof that a cyclone effect is beneficial to the burn factor and will increase the efficiency of the burner that produces it,the improvement of a lower burn time,etc..etc..I have yet to see that.I understand about the "burning of the gases"..blah,blah,blah..my woodstove does that...
I see big discrepancies in JKs boils,Carols boils and what the website says that stove 'will do" with 3oz of wood.JK goes on to say his testing is with 16 oz of water,carols times are way longer with a liter..but the website claims the short times with the "one Liter amount"

I sure as hell am not buying one for $90+..I'll stick to a tin can and a can opener..or a $3-4 "ikea stainless utensil caddy burner" with some cut/bent bottom fin mods to make the "cyclone" for it's "coolness factor". :o ..JMO....

Or... I'll make one that folds flat for taking up less space....My pot is full of other stuff I want to carry.... ;)

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 12:43 pm
by zelph
I get the feeling that jasonklass fired it up once and that was it. His answer to the guys question makes me think that. He sells them, he'll say only good things about the stove. The container looks well ventilated and should burn fast and hot and use fuel accordingly.

A "DIY" 1 quart can stove will boil 2 cups with one load of twigs if the fuel is dry and stacked in such a manner that air will be able to move upward. The stove need not be double walled.

Watch his video again....at 2:50 the windscreen is 1" away from the side of the pot befor boil and then see it at 5:58 it's 3" away from pot. You can bet that it took several times of loading wood to get the boil. ;) It's called "bait and switch"

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 8:36 am
by roob
Ive been tempted by an idea of a solid fuel cyclone stove. not a tablet, but powder fuel. If you could get (and it should be possible with a light fuel) the air intake underneath the fuel then you could fluidise the powder, creating perfect combustion conditions. I am going to have an experiment with this, the main problem is going to be starting the process. Has anyone got any fuel suggestions?

If it works, i could be very efficient, and I hear solid fuel is really light.

Roob

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 4:00 pm
by zelph
If it works, i could be very efficient, and I hear solid fuel is really light.

Roob
Powdered coal should work. It's what power plants use to create steam to generate electricity.

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 5:22 pm
by roob
I know, I thought about that but it would be pretty smokey I think. Also the sulphur (sulfur if your american) wouldnt be welcomed into my tent! I can experiment with it I guess. I was thinking maybe crushing up fire lighters, or solid fuel tablets. I have no experience with solid fuel tablets, are they just like fire lighters?

Roob

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 11:59 pm
by zelph
Start out with coal, it's easy to crush into very fine powder. I suppose esbit tabs would grind into powder also.
Get the stove to working and then look for the cleanest and best fuel. Make your professors proud :D

Re: Cyclone Stoves: Part 1

Posted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:19 pm
by DarenN
JT that is very cool!! :ugeek:

looking around at all my stove stuff and thinking...........
i picked up a fancy feest can and punched 8 (1/4") holes around the rim, bent them tangetially, dumped in some MH and lit 'er up. it cycloned for a couple seconds and went to chimney. damn recycled heat!! aha! says i! :idea: i put a wick and screen type burner in the bottom of the FF can. [(the mini polish). at 1/2 ounce max cap]. it cycloned though two entire burns! what fun!! :D thanks for bringing something new for us to play with. :ugeek: