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creative aeration

Posted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 10:53 am
by cadyak
I have been experimenting with different configurations of aeration holes. Here are a few different patterns. :geek:
My attempt at being artistic while enhancing performance. :D

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Re: creative aeration

Posted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 1:57 pm
by shakeylegs
Beautiful craftsmanship! How are you creating the holes?

I've been thinking about a cauldera type windscreen that would function for both alcohol and gasifying wood stoves. Reading about the gasifying stoves, I learned that the optimum ratio of air flow into the stove (bottom and top) is 1 to 5 - 1 unit of air at the bottom to every 5 units at the top. Don't know if that would apply to an alcohol setup.

shakeylegs

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:15 pm
by zelph
Very nice! Ikea will hire you as a designer for their kitchen wares :D

Now if you can heat treat them to draw out the blue colors......that would be kooel 8-)

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Fri Jul 12, 2013 9:58 pm
by Perez Turner
Looking nice and attractive! What type of results and enhancing performance you got from these creative aeration?

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 11:35 pm
by cadyak
Beautiful craftsmanship! How are you creating the holes? Thank you very much. I use a combination of drilling, hand punch, and dremel

I've been thinking about a cauldera type windscreen that would function for both alcohol and gasifying wood stoves
. I think Zelph is making something like that now. Looks sweet. :D
I Reading about the gasifying stoves, I learned that the optimum ratio of air flow into the stove (bottom and top) is 1 to 5 - 1 unit of air at the bottom to every 5 units at the top. Don't know if that would apply to an alcohol setup.
I had not heard of the ratio but that sounds about right. the stoves all work great with just the standard holes at the top and bottom. I have been making them so long and have decided that I want to make them more distinctive. The additional aeration is nice too. :geek: I keep the additional holes pretty small as I have seen wind blow fire sideways 3 ft out of an ikea stove. I make my bottom holes a little smaller and add more of them.
Very nice! Ikea will hire you as a designer for their kitchen wares :D That would be a cool job. To get paid to tinker....

I have been doing lots of burn testing as of late and have been really impressed with the performance of all of the stoves including a couple of new ones. I am making another larger stove for nesting in taller pots like the Snowpeak 900 and 1.4L . It is the taller stove on the right in the top picture and will boil the 1.4L without adding any fuel. I really hope to make a couple of videos soon.

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:27 am
by zelph
I like how they fit inside a quart lid as a ground protector....nice!

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 1:32 pm
by cadyak
Yep, standard sizing runs rampant in container components. The std lid has 3 or 4 diff. dia. rings of different depths (both sides), making for many different possible ways to mate with the cylindrical cup.

That being said I believe that people worry too much about having a ground protector. I like them for cooking in snow or on concrete but they arent really necessary for most anything else.
In 90% of the places I go there is already some kind of fire ring or remnants, so just clear a little spot in the dirt and jam your stove in the ground, you can stake them down for maximum stability.
Anyplace that you would build a campfire is perfect for using a woodstove with no base. I have even made many fires on wet ground (dry wood) with a firemug with no base. Top lit of course :D
The base weighs almost as much as the stove. the Micro Woodstoves above without the bases weigh 2oz and can support large filled pots.

I have yet to see a woodstove that when placed on say, a wooden bench doesnt damage the wood or heat up the dirt underneath it to a high temp. So as long as when your fire is out you cover up your little 4 inch diameter circle of heated dirt it still seems pretty low impact. :geek:

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 5:27 pm
by zelph
I have yet to see a woodstove that when placed on say, a wooden bench doesn't damage the wood or heat up the dirt underneath it to a high temp. So as long as when your fire is out you cover up your little 4 inch diameter circle of heated dirt it still seems pretty low impact. :geek:
That is correct. That little 4" dia. spot is easy to make disappear. One thing that err-ks me is dog crap on the trails. I don't mind deer and other woodland animals leaving their crap around but dogs need to learn how to cover it up. :P Women need to learn how to cover up the little TP rosettes laying next to the base of trees :o

You sure do a nice job on punchin them holes. Good punches are expensive but worth it.

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 10:36 pm
by cadyak
Thanks! It is a very hard metal to work with but it makes a kickass stove that will last many years. :D It can easily take me a few hours to make just one of them. :geek:


Look how small this one is. It is cut down to fit the 500ml trappers mug and weighs just under 2oz. It is extremely strong and easily holds enough wood to boil this pot without reloading. I have used the trappers mug on a few lightweight trips as my only pot. I left the Firemug at home (hard to believe I know) and used just a starlyte stove for a reduction in volume but The micro woodstove packs away in the mug along with tinder, starlyte stove and a couple of oz of alcohol which allows me to make the sweet little woodfire I love so much :) without any other space taken up in my handlebar bag. It also only uses about a handful of twigs to do the job. I am planning to use this setup for an upcoming bike tour.

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I have a couple of different types of cups that I can use to make stoves of this size :geek:

Re: creative aeration

Posted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 8:58 am
by zelph
It's really nice how the cups lend themselves into becoming stoves. I used salt shakers to make a couple prototypes but were on the small size.....worked for me but difficult to punch holes at the base. Don't like drilling SS :mrgreen:

I think I've gotten Dan Durston (backpackinglight.com) interested in vertical stacking and top lighting. :D