Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

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SSGHawk
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Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by SSGHawk » Wed May 07, 2014 10:42 pm

This another idea to possibly squeeze a couple of more BTUs out of the Starlyte. I need to commit this to a post hopefully to solicit good suggestions but also I know that once I get the Conquistador kit I will forget everything else.

While the Foster and Conquistador pot bottoms are much closer to flat than the original that still have some ridges. Heat sinks are cheap and they hardly weigh anything, Several of my other pots, like my IMUSA are arguable flat. My plan is to use the upside down Heat sinks as the top of the pot stand with an appropriate sizes flame hole to allow the flame to directly heat the pot bottom. The legs will be like Dan's but will snap on and off the heat sinks for easy storage.
THoughts anyone.?
I hate always asking Dan ; he has got to be busier that heck and I feel like I take up too niuch of his time..

Best regards,
Sarge or Hawk or Paul

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WanderingStovie
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by WanderingStovie » Thu May 08, 2014 11:50 am

You want to heat water, not metal, so keep the weight down. You should know the specific heat of the heat sink material, and how much the heat sink weighs. Aluminum melts at a much lower temperature than steel or titanium, and your heat sink would likely be in the hot part of the flame where it could glow red hot, or melt in the case of aluminum. There have been some meltdowns of an aluminum heat exchanger bonded to the bottom of a titanium pot, at least with a canister stove. That happens when the water boils dry, or food with insufficient water content sticks to the bottom, burns, and forms an insulating layer. You might get away with an aluminum heat exchanger if it makes good thermal contact with the pot, your stove does not overpower the ability to absorb and transfer heat, and you only boil water with your pot.

I personally have heated titanium tent peg pot supports red hot, and steel pot stands red hot, both while using alcohol stoves. I had a pressurized burner pop open and meltdown. The sudden decrease in pressure can cause the alcohol to flash boil and/or spray over a large area making a large fireball.

If I wanted to add a heat exchanger to a pot, I might attach it to the side walls rather than the bottom. That way, the heat from the hottest part of the flame has a short path through the bottom of the pot, and cooler exhaust should flow up the sides of the pot. An overpowered stove will shoot flames up the side of a pot, so it is still possible to melt an aluminum heat exchanger around the side wall. I have melted an aluminum windscreen that was too close to the side of the pot, with flames licking the side of the pot.

I am not sure what the best way to bond a heat sink to a pot would be, maybe weld it on, or clamp it tightly to the pot with heat sink compound between the two pieces.

SSGHawk
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by SSGHawk » Thu May 08, 2014 4:48 pm

Some excellent points. I have seen my Starlyte boil and aluminum melt when I played things too close to the edge. Heat sinks cost pennies. Before I actually build a pot stand prototype with heat sinks, I will put some heat sinks up sides down on my Starlyte integral pot stand with my infrared temperature meter and see what happens. (And what ever happens will be fun. Is this a great hobby or what?)
I shall report back.
Tornado here have to go
Paul

SSGHawk
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by SSGHawk » Thu May 08, 2014 6:45 pm

Wander,
Back now.

Thanks very much for your input.
This is not ever expected to be a commercially viable project; just a fun project. If, like a blind squirrel, I stumble over a nut here , Dan will be most welcome to have the idea. After all, without him I would still be packing a Coleman one burner.

Yes, I totally agree about wanting the heat on the bottom of the pot. My plan was to have only a 1/2" wide by about 3/4" tall upside down heatsink near the very edge of the pot, kind of like a jet boil. The Starlyte flame will still be concentrated on the pot bottom. Probably won't provide enough benefit to even be worth the effort.; but it is just playing around for fun.


I really wanted to have something like the heat sinks on the sides of the pot. An engineer I know on another site said unless they were almost machined into the pot, the heat transfer will be terrible. Best I can come up with on the sides is ridges all the way up the side of the pot.

Going to try to melt a heat sink with the old trusted Starlyte.
Regards
Paul

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WanderingStovie
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by WanderingStovie » Fri May 09, 2014 6:00 am

Maybe you could corrugate some thin metal with a tool like this: http://www.joann.com/marvy-corru-gator- ... l#start=34, and wrap it around the side of the pot. An outer cylindrical jacket of thin metal could put inward pressure on the corrugated part, contain the exhaust, and block wind. You would need a smooth walled pot, or cut holes in the corrugated part as needed to not crush the ridgelines in Zelph's can pot. The can pot has a thin side wall, so there is a limit to how much inward pressure you can apply without crushing the pot.

SSGHawk
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by SSGHawk » Fri May 09, 2014 10:45 am

I have a couple different versions of those corrugators and have tried something similar to what you are suggesting. I also used copper hi temp adhesive to attach the sides of a ribbed Spam Spread can. I could not tell any difference and that is when my engineer friend said that the heat transfer just could not be efficient that way.

I did try to melt an aluminum heat sink last night with a fully fueled old style Starlyte with the built in pot stand. I put the heat sink upside down on the pot stand stainless steel wire and took periodic temperature readings. The stainless wires measured over 350 Degrees F but the heat sink was less than 200 degrees F the entire time. Not sure what that indicates. I guess I expected the heat sink to absorb the heat and get to a higher temperature.
I have ordered some larger heat sinks from China, of course, and I expect them in a about a week. I will need to cut those down to the "picture frame size for the outer edges of the pot stand and then braze them together.

And the game continues.
Regards,
Paul

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zelph
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by zelph » Fri May 09, 2014 11:03 am

I always thought of "heat sinks" being used to draw heat out of items.

The "JetBoil" folks told us that the heat fins made their product better than everyone else. We can only rely on what they say. Take it with a grain of salt ;)

Somebody came out with a bowl that had the fins on it....who was it?
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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WanderingStovie
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by WanderingStovie » Fri May 09, 2014 1:38 pm

Copper would have a higher melting point than aluminum and conduct heat well. That might be worth attaching to the bottom of a pot.

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WanderingStovie
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by WanderingStovie » Fri May 09, 2014 1:46 pm

zelph wrote:I always thought of "heat sinks" being used to draw heat out of items.

The "JetBoil" folks told us that the heat fins made their product better than everyone else. We can only rely on what they say. Take it with a grain of salt ;)

Somebody came out with a bowl that had the fins on it....who was it?
I have a circa 2011 JetBoil. It takes up too much room. I use the GSI Outdoors Halulite Minimalist pot. I also bought a Kmart grease pot to test my stoves, because of its wide bottom and relatively thin aluminum.

Olicamp XTS is one such pot. There is also a JetBoil copycat out there.

SSGHawk
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Re: Using heat sinKs built into the pot stand

Post by SSGHawk » Sat May 10, 2014 9:49 pm

Other than extensive brazing I do not know a good way to permanently attached the heat sink to the pot bottom.
That is why I am making sure that the flame hits the pot bottom and I only try to scavenge some heat as the exhaust passes the outer edge of the pot stand around the very outside edge of the pot bottom.

The comment that heat sinks dissipate heat came to my mind when I tried to melt the heat sink and it never got much more than 120 degrees F?


I have an Olicamp XTS * ( as of jet untested) I should fire up one of the many Zelph stoves I have a see what impact on temperature the Olicamp XTS feature has.
IT STILL IS FUN!!!!!

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