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Re: Most Gross

Posted: Tue Dec 25, 2007 3:07 pm
by zelph
Turtle2 wrote:I will preface this by saying I used to wreck dive in Lake Michigan. Well, a friend gave us a coho salmon taken (proudly) from Lake Michigan. It was about 2 ft long. I had a recipe for stuffing a whole salmon. After cooking it, I could not eat it. All I could smell was nasty Lake Michigan water and could not get a forkful of that near my lips. I threw most of it out to the cats. My husband couldn't understand why I couldn't eat it.
Last I heard, it was recommended only a certain amount of fish from the lake should be consumed because of PCB content. The fatty fish especially, like the salmon. Lake perch are my favorite fish. I fished many a day along the shores of Lake Michigan, good memories :D

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Tue Dec 25, 2007 8:43 pm
by Pure Mahem
Never used to like perch they always seemed mushy to me. But then one year I went ice fishing with a buddy yum yum now they are my favorite. my buddy said the secret to perch was to catch them when its really cold and cook em up fresh. We had a huge fish fry that day best fish I ever had. And funny thing is I'm not really a person that cares for fish, but I could eat that any day. Glad icefishing seasons coming! :mrgreen:

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Wed Dec 26, 2007 5:27 pm
by Mags
I have a tripe story as well....

My great grandmother was from just south of Naples. I was fortunate enough to know her until I was ~8 years old.

I still remember her being excited at see her three great-grandsons. Three people to carry on the family name. Her husband, my great-grandfather, died as young man in his 30s. To see three people to carry on the name meant much to her.

I remember going to her house in Providence with my parents and grandparents. Salted olives, strong tasting cheese, fried squash flowers. All things that seemed to my 8 yr old (or less) palette a bit odd at best, gross at worse. As a young child, I wanted McDonald's like my other friends..not this strange food! (Yes..I am still wondering what the heck I was thinking). As I become older, I learned to appreciate this simple food that came out of the poor culture of il mezzogiorno This poor person food is now extremely expensive in high end restaurants. For my great-grandmother, it was just the food that poor people grew up with. Something to fill the stomach and feed not only the body, but the soul.

One dish that I have NOT grown to appreciate or want to taste again is tripe. As a young boy of 7 or 8, my Dad gave me some that great-grandma made. It was chewy, mushy and rubbery all at once. I could only take one bite. I wanted my Happy Meal! :D Tripe is the ultimate peasant dish; something made of a necessity when you could not waste any part of an animal. The genius of most ethnic cuisine is to take the unpalatable and make it exquisite. Chitlins, haggis, menudo, tripe (or trippa). In modern times, even in Naples, few people eat this dish anymore.

Maybe I will get ambitious again. The large Hispanic community in Colorado has the same organ meats for sale in their grocery store. I can only imagine what magic she would work on those "poor people" foods. Tripe is still the worse thing I ever ate...but there is still hope to revise my thoughts on that food. ;)

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 12:07 am
by zelph
Pure Mahem wrote:Never used to like perch they always seemed mushy to me. But then one year I went ice fishing with a buddy yum yum now they are my favorite. my buddy said the secret to perch was to catch them when its really cold and cook em up fresh. We had a huge fish fry that day best fish I ever had. And funny thing is I'm not really a person that cares for fish, but I could eat that any day. Glad icefishing seasons coming! :mrgreen:
Fresh is the key to eating fish. Fresh fillets served with a simple salad and Italian Dressing. SoooooGooood

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 12:15 am
by zelph
Mags wrote:I have a tripe story as well....

My great grandmother was from just south of Naples. I was fortunate enough to know her until I was ~8 years old.

I still remember her being excited at see her three great-grandsons. Three people to carry on the family name. Her husband, my great-grandfather, died as young man in his 30s. To see three people to carry on the name meant much to her.

I remember going to her house in Providence with my parents and grandparents. Salted olives, strong tasting cheese, fried squash flowers. All things that seemed to my 8 yr old (or less) palette a bit odd at best, gross at worse. As a young child, I wanted McDonald's like my other friends..not this strange food! (Yes..I am still wondering what the heck I was thinking). As I become older, I learned to appreciate this simple food that came out of the poor culture of il mezzogiorno This poor person food is now extremely expensive in high end restaurants. For my great-grandmother, it was just the food that poor people grew up with. Something to fill the stomach and feed not only the body, but the soul.

One dish that I have NOT grown to appreciate or want to taste again is tripe. As a young boy of 7 or 8, my Dad gave me some that great-grandma made. It was chewy, mushy and rubbery all at once. I could only take one bite. I wanted my Happy Meal! :D Tripe is the ultimate peasant dish; something made of a necessity when you could not waste any part of an animal. The genius of most ethnic cuisine is to take the unpalatable and make it exquisite. Chitlins, haggis, menudo, tripe (or trippa). In modern times, even in Naples, few people eat this dish anymore.

Maybe I will get ambitious again. The large Hispanic community in Colorado has the same organ meats for sale in their grocery store. I can only imagine what magic she would work on those "poor people" foods. Tripe is still the worse thing I ever ate...but there is still hope to revise my thoughts on that food. ;)
I love those ethnic stories of Grandma's cooking. It's all in the spices and who blends and cooks them. Tripe stew would probably taste it's best if prepared in that fashion.

It's quite an experience to brouse an hispanic grocery store that has a meat department the entire length of the store. Every conceivable animal part and fish seems to be there. I love hispanic cuisine (mild not hot) :mrgreen:

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 12:54 am
by Pure Mahem
I am not eating the lining of a cows stomach, I don't care how you prepare it! I've had chittlins too, and never again! :mrgreen:

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 1:07 am
by zelph
Pure Mahem wrote:I am not eating the lining of a cows stomach, I don't care how you prepare it! I've had chittlins too, and never again! :mrgreen:
You've gotta have alotta brass to eat chittlins!!!! No way jose!!!! :mrgreen:

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 1:59 am
by Pure Mahem
Didn't know what it was til after I ate a little, they sure are some god awful stuff! :mrgreen:

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:34 am
by Nightwalker
I grew up eating pork brains and scrambled eggs. It was just poor-folks Southern food. The cool thing is that us kids never knew we were poor. Gotta love M & D for that! :)

Re: Most Gross

Posted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:20 am
by zelph
Nightwalker wrote:I grew up eating pork brains and scrambled eggs. It was just poor-folks Southern food. The cool thing is that us kids never knew we were poor. Gotta love M & D for that! :)
When the're mixed with scrambled eggs they taste good (especially with ketchup). The texture and thought of where they come from invokes the gag reflex. Just cant get myself to put em down.

Who likes ketchup on eggs?