Page 2 of 3

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Wed Jan 07, 2009 3:30 pm
by zelph
HFinster wrote:Anecdotes do not a scientific paper make. There are smokers who've lived past 100. Should we conclude from this that smoking is safe? Visual inspection cannot guarantee that your water is pathogen free, period. You can drink water from a sewer and not get sick. You can drink water from a sewer and die. Mr. Shlimmer has not found a way to avoid Giardia, Cryptosporidium, E-Coli, Hepatitis, Polio or any of a number of other water borne infections. He has simply laid out a numbers game. That he's playing it himself is foolhardy. That he's enticing others to do the same is unconscionable .


I quote:

Erik Schlimmer said: But, has Giardia really infested our once pure waters? I calmly answer, "No, it has not" But ask nearly any outdoor proffesional and you will receive a harried, Oh yes it has" So why do I veer from the educators who teach the "industry standard" of treating every drop of backcountry water? Because I've done my homework.
The supporting evidence for not treating backcountry water breaks down into five logical, myth-busting arguments.


HFinster, welcome to bplite. Erik Schimler is talking about "Backcountry" water. Water away from the cities, away from where people are in large numbers.

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Wed Jan 07, 2009 7:21 pm
by russb
HFinster, I agree... however the claim that has been made by many is that backcountry water is not safe and is contaminated with giardia, crypto etc... Erik has simply questioned at assumption and provided evidence to support why we should not blindly accept the industry claim. Out of curiosity I contacted some people who do water testing in the Adirondacks to find out if they have, or knew anyone who has ever tested the water within the Adirondack blue line. They knew of no scientific studies investigating the prevalence of pathogens in the backcounty water. I completely agree with you that anecdotes do not a scientific paper make, yet this is precisely what has been done to "convince" many that the backcounty water is unsafe and must be filtered, treated etc... The onus is on those who claim pathogens exist in the backcountry water with enough prevalence to pose a risk of contracting the disease. Erik has simply pointed out the burden of proof has not been met.

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Thu Jan 08, 2009 11:44 am
by HFinster
Erik has simply pointed out the burden of proof has not been met.

He's doing rather more than that. He's encouraging people to make an unscientific assessment of whether water is safe to drink, and he uses his good luck rather than sound science to back his arguments.

H

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Thu Jan 08, 2009 11:49 am
by zelph
HFinster wrote:Erik has simply pointed out the burden of proof has not been met.

He's doing rather more than that. He's encouraging people to make an unscientific assessment of whether water is safe to drink, and he uses his good luck rather than sound science to back his arguments.

H


I think it's ok to do that in a "backcountry" situation. Follow his recommendations and I think all will be ok.

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 3:18 pm
by fingerlakeshiker
Got sick once. I filter and then treat. Maybe a little overkill.I am more willing to drink enough water to stay well hydrated if I am not cringing when I put the water bottle to my lips.

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 3:34 pm
by zelph
fingerlakeshiker wrote:Got sick once. I filter and then treat. Maybe a little overkill.I am more willing to drink enough water to stay well hydrated if I am not cringing when I put the water bottle to my lips.


It only takes one time to put the fear into a person.

I have boiled water many times to purify when It was questionable looking. I would always have time in the evening to boil what I needed for the next day or two. I've never used chemicals to treat.

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 3:43 pm
by Vibe
Well I'm not hiking in the "Backcountry", so I'm still looking for a packable filter. For some reason I like the MSR HyperFlow. But I'm not fond of dropping a C note to get one. I'd like to get one with a charcoal pack as well, (which the Hyperflow does not have) in case I do think that a bit of bleach or chemical would be needed. At least that way I can take the taste of the treatment back out of it.

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 4:37 pm
by Mister Krabs
Vibe wrote:Well I'm not hiking in the "Backcountry", so I'm still looking for a packable filter. For some reason I like the MSR HyperFlow. But I'm not fond of dropping a C note to get one. I'd like to get one with a charcoal pack as well, (which the Hyperflow does not have) in case I do think that a bit of bleach or chemical would be needed. At least that way I can take the taste of the treatment back out of it.


Have you checked out the DIY gravity setups using the 40$ sawyer filter from walmart?

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 4:40 pm
by Mister Krabs
Mister Krabs wrote:
Vibe wrote:Well I'm not hiking in the "Backcountry", so I'm still looking for a packable filter. For some reason I like the MSR HyperFlow. But I'm not fond of dropping a C note to get one. I'd like to get one with a charcoal pack as well,


FWIW, I use a bota squeeze filter. I squeeze it into a gatoraide bottle.
Best part, 13 dollars.
http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/,995 ... stem-.html

Re: GiardiaMyth-Buster

Posted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 10:47 am
by Ridgerunner
I usually take a Pur water filter but always have aquamir iodine tablets and aftertaste tablets that take up very little space. It only takes one time to make your outdoor experience a miserable time and with all that is involved, time and money wise, why risk it?