Sunrise Over Mawenzi

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Tamerlin
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby Tamerlin » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:07 pm

Thanks! Now, if only I could convince some people to BUY my photographs... then I'd be able to make more of them :)

The altitude sickness pills, as I understand it, thicken the blood and help it to remain oxygenated, or something along those lines. It's supposed to mitigate the effects of apoxia.

I started summit day pretty dehydrated; that was the disadvantage of relying on the porters for water. They had to boil water for 15 minutes before giving it to us, so the turnaround was pretty slow; I'd give them my bottles in the evening and get them back, filled, in the morning, so I started every day with a hydration deficit. Had I known about this I'd have brought an extra bottle so I'd have water to drink while waiting for refills.

I could have just gone to the stream near camp at most of them to get water since I brought my MIOX purifier with me, but that wasn't an option at Kibo Hut -- there's no water there, so the porters had to bring it up from around 2 miles away.

The guides are on the ball about this; when they see someone starting to lose coherence, they start asking questions, and if the answers indicate altitude sickness, they send you back to base camp. In my case, a porter and a guide stabilized me while we scree-skated post-haste back to Kibo Hut -- the guide said that he'd seen people get like me before, and it usually cleared up once they got below 16,000 feet.

We had enough guides along on our ascent that we could send some people back without forcing the entire group to give up. So we were covered -- the Kilimanjaro mountain guides know what they're doing, and they take safety very seriously.

We were lucky -- we had cloudy weather when we started, which kept the temperatures at low elevations moderate (so, no hiking in 95 degree heat), but the sky was crystal clear on summit day, so the sun warmed us up pretty nicely. The clouds floating in around Mawenzi in that picture didn't reach us; the sky was crystal clear when we started our descent -- so by the time we got back down to 12,000 feet it was pretty hot.

This was my first real big-mountain experience, and I didn't take any pills for altitude, so I think I did pretty well in getting to 18,600 feet in spite of starting with a hydration deficit. Hopefully next time I'll be better hydrated and I'll not only make it to the summit, but also have enough presence of mind to operate my large-format camera and get some really nice shots from up there :)
Rakesh Malik, Photographer/Owner
White Crane Photography, LLC
http://www.WhiteCranePhotography.com

Support my Art for Clean Air fun raiser:
http://indiegogo.com/WhiteCraneClimb

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ConnieD
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby ConnieD » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:54 pm

That's interesting information. I am glad you added it.

I have heard that russian climbers took a regimen of "vitamin Q" (quercetin) ahead of the climb to increase their blood oxygen-carrying capacity. I did see one written article at a famous Berkley, CA vitamin shop.

There may be articles about it somewhere online.

I have the peculiar effect I feel refreshed starting at 7,000-9,000'. I keep feeling better. I have no explanation.

I drag around at sea level.

I think people will purchase your photographs: I say, sell photo murals to business' and public organizations.

Do not sell exclusive use.

Sell art prints, when people have money. Artist grants are more reliable, at the beginning. Maybe always more reliable. Every artist I know has artist grants, in the background, for more steady income. Art patrons understand this.

Most successful photographers have a shop, or a presence, in resort towns like Sausalito, CA and Sante Fe, NM.

I know of one photographer, who does very well, with a small shop in Point Reyes Station, CA.

I know homeowners like "big prints" behind the couch. I know college kids like poster-size prints to create their decor.

Photographs in mailing tubes sell well, to them.

There are home-owners, or renters, want framed "big prints" for behind the couch in singles, twos (diptych), or even threes (triptych).

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ConnieD
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby ConnieD » Fri Mar 04, 2011 11:00 pm

Participate in "open studio" each year. The newspaper does the advertising for you.

I know one artist (I am "smitten") who participates in "open studio" only.

He prints his own large photographs on a rather pricey Epson photoprinter with multiple ink feeds. His B&W photos as well. They look like they are made in the best photo lab. He uses a MAC PC.

Really. I inspected the photos closely.

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zelph
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby zelph » Sat Mar 05, 2011 2:48 pm

I'm back in town also. :D

From Tamerlins blog:

Book Review — Captured
Tuesday, December 14th, 2010 | Posted by | Comments (2)
If you aren’t familiar with Moose Peterson and his photography, you’re missing out. It’s worth a look; he does wonderful wildlife photography.


Throughout the narrative, his love for the animals is clear. He doesn’t photograph wildlife for wealth and prestige, he photographs wildlife for the love of the wildlife.

He also points out a number of times that you can do this too — he doesn’t attempt to imply that he’s anything special, and in fact his humility is both refreshing and encouraging. That’s not to say that he implies that it’s easy, quite the contrary — he alludes to the difficulty in making a living as a photographer, but the rewards, like the opportunities that he gets to work with biologists and get close to and photograph rare and endangered species is infectious


If we learn from Moose's experiences and way of life I would say get yourself 3 cameras, one for wildlife, a macro for flowers and insects and on for landscape. Become diversified to broaden your horizons, make yourself valuable in all areas. If you can get one camera and multiple lens all the better. :geek:

he alludes to the difficulty in making a living as a photographer, but the rewards, like the opportunities that he gets to work with biologists and get close to and photograph rare and endangered species is infectious


As it is with Moose, so will the rewards be for Tamerlin. :D
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

Tamerlin
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby Tamerlin » Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:21 pm

ConnieD wrote:That's interesting information. I am glad you added it.


I learned quite a bit about high elevation trekking on this trip!

I have heard that russian climbers took a regimen of "vitamin Q" (quercetin) ahead of the climb to increase their blood oxygen-carrying capacity. I did see one written article at a famous Berkley, CA vitamin shop.


I haven't heard about that one. Our mountain guide didn't recommend the pills, though; he said that they create symptoms that are very similar to elevation sickness to begin with. He basically said that what caused the most problems for most people was not eating and/or drinking enough.

I have the peculiar effect I feel refreshed starting at 7,000-9,000'. I keep feeling better. I have no explanation.


Odd -- that I haven't heard of before.

I think people will purchase your photographs: I say, sell photo murals to business' and public organizations.


I have to do a lot of marketing! :)

Do not sell exclusive use.


Definitely not! :)

Sell art prints, when people have money. Artist grants are more reliable, at the beginning. Maybe always more reliable. Every artist I know has artist grants, in the background, for more steady income. Art patrons understand this.


I have to look into applying for grants, both who to ask and how. The "who" part is first, probably.

I know homeowners like "big prints" behind the couch. I know college kids like poster-size prints to create their decor.


Those are two major markets that I aim to pursue, when I figure out how to get the word out to enough of an audience to make some sales.


Photographs in mailing tubes sell well, to them.

There are home-owners, or renters, want framed "big prints" for behind the couch in singles, twos (diptych), or even threes (triptych).


Big prints I can do -- especially with the large format shots. Those can print up to 40x50 inches and still look razor sharp up close. :)

And the ones printed on brushed aluminum have turned out to be stunning :)
Rakesh Malik, Photographer/Owner
White Crane Photography, LLC
http://www.WhiteCranePhotography.com

Support my Art for Clean Air fun raiser:
http://indiegogo.com/WhiteCraneClimb

Tamerlin
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Location: Seattle, WA
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby Tamerlin » Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:24 pm

ConnieD wrote:Participate in "open studio" each year. The newspaper does the advertising for you.


Open studio?

He prints his own large photographs on a rather pricey Epson photoprinter with multiple ink feeds. His B&W photos as well. They look like they are made in the best photo lab. He uses a MAC PC.

Really. I inspected the photos closely.


I don't have a printer of my own, but I'm working with a guy who not only has a very nice printer, but also does a lot of advertising work, so he's been making some wonderful prints for me... including the ones brushed aluminum -- he found a place to get the metal, and figured out how to print on it with his nice, snazzy Epson inkjet.
Rakesh Malik, Photographer/Owner
White Crane Photography, LLC
http://www.WhiteCranePhotography.com

Support my Art for Clean Air fun raiser:
http://indiegogo.com/WhiteCraneClimb

Tamerlin
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Joined: Fri Jun 04, 2010 7:32 pm
Location: Seattle, WA
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby Tamerlin » Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:33 pm

zelph wrote:I'm back in town also. :D



Welcome back :)

If we learn from Moose's experiences and way of life I would say get yourself 3 cameras, one for wildlife, a macro for flowers and insects and on for landscape. Become diversified to broaden your horizons, make yourself valuable in all areas. If you can get one camera and multiple lens all the better. :geek:


While versatility has some advantages, generalizing too much can also be a problem. Photographing wildlife is very different from photographing landscapes, and the required skills to do both well are very different. It's like trying to be a great martial artist by practicing six different arts; it doesn't work -- you end up being the jack of many trades, and master of nothing.

As it is with Moose, so will the rewards be for Tamerlin. :D


I'll get there... but since I do fine art landscapes, my approach is going to involved working with environmentalists rather than biologists because I can do more for them than for biologists, and I'm also going to look for inroads into the adventure travel industry, and start offering photography workshops...
Rakesh Malik, Photographer/Owner
White Crane Photography, LLC
http://www.WhiteCranePhotography.com

Support my Art for Clean Air fun raiser:
http://indiegogo.com/WhiteCraneClimb

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zelph
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby zelph » Sun Mar 06, 2011 5:22 pm

I don't have a printer of my own, but I'm working with a guy who not only has a very nice printer, but also does a lot of advertising work, so he's been making some wonderful prints for me... including the ones brushed aluminum -- he found a place to get the metal, and figured out how to print on it with his nice, snazzy Epson inkjet.


Sounds like you're working with the right guy(advertising) :D

Stick with "landcapes" and be a "Master" You can become the next Ansel Adams ;)

http://www.google.com/images?q=ansel+ad ... 59&bih=793
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby ConnieD » Sun Mar 06, 2011 6:17 pm

He basically said that what caused the most problems for most people was not eating and/or drinking enough.

...especially, not enough water days before the climb, and, during the climb.

We used Wyler's lemonade and lemon drops to increase our sensation of thirst, so we would drink more water.

I sold my couch art by setting up a large format in or near a pricey neighborhood on a particularly photogenic partly cloudy day after rain on the weekend. I never seemed to have enough cards. I gave away every business card I had printed. Other artists, with more cash on hand than me, gave postcards with a sample of their work left over from "openings".

I have to look into applying for grants, both who to ask and how. The "who" part is first, probably.

Intersection for the Arts, San Francisco, CA may tell you of similiar organizations in your region. Remember: two shows per year, even if "only" participating in a group show. They will very likely ask what shows have you had. Two shows, you are an artist. Get in shows. Shows at hospitals. Doctors have money. Shows in coffee shops in likely neighborhoods. People have money. City sponsored shows. Win a prize: get your work in the newspaper. I won a prize in an Art Show in San Francisco, CA in the Travel category.

Bellevue Arts and Crafts Fair, now called the Bellevue Arts Museum artsfair or Bellevue Festival of the Arts.

It is inland near greater Seattle, WA.

Elton Bennett, the Olympic Peninsula silkscreen graphic artist sold his work there.

Large corporations and big local business and banks like landscape art photography on the walls in their lobby. Inquire right before "tax time". I think they find a way to write it off.

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zelph
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Re: Sunrise Over Mawenzi

Postby zelph » Sun Mar 06, 2011 6:50 pm

Elton Bennett, the Olympic Peninsula silkscreen graphic artist sold his work there.


That's a great way to do prints. Have them numbered and make big bucks.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/


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