Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

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irrationalsolutions
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by irrationalsolutions » Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:01 am

this has me thinking about pots again. when we diy a pot should we be worrying about foodgrade metal? what is a good size for a one peerson pot? i have been toying with the idea of getting the metal and making one but i keep thinking about the quality of the metal, should i?
“Do or do not... there is NO try.” Yoda

Luke "Whats in (out) there?" Yoda "Only what you take with you."

Luke "I can’t believe it." Yoda "That is why you Fail.”

hoz
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by hoz » Wed Dec 03, 2008 9:00 am

Food grade metal...Cast iron? Stainless steel? Titanium? Aluminum? Copper?

quickpoint
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by quickpoint » Wed Dec 03, 2008 11:45 am

Yes they're all Ok, despite some questions raised on alum. The only dangerous metal that is sometimes shown on some MYOG sites/videos to be avoided is tin. It is now suggested not to store opened tin cans in the frig but to use a cup instead.

Making a pot? Forget about it. Needs mega forging press and soldering is not advised. Titanium is best weightwise but it's best used to make stoves. Ayce at thru-hiker used to sell it but now advises to buy it cheap on ebay (0.016 6Al4V). I can't figure out why people pay $10 to $25 + shipping for empty Heini cans to poison themselves with plastics! Just visit large catering stores to find alum freezer bowls/champagne-wine buckets etc. and instead of buying expensive frying pans? Just get some ultra light small/mid baking trays in those stores for next to nothing. Most mid to large cities have a catering superstore for chefs and restaurateurs. For alum cups: Take the top off a sterno can with a rim cutting can opener.
http://zenstoves.net/Sterno.htm
You can hack off the handles one of these:
http://www.google.com/products?q=alumin ... =N&start=0

If you got money for Titanium the 2 links below are good and snowpeak's probably the best deal going, look for sales.
http://www.snowpeak.com/back/cookware/titanium.html
Click on page 3 onwards:
http://www.google.com/products?q=snowpe ... &scoring=p
http://www.antigravitygear.com/evernew.php

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zelph
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by zelph » Wed Dec 03, 2008 12:38 pm

All good info quickpoint, thanks.

A quick question. Who was the explorer that experienced lead poisoning of his entire crew while on expedition to the north pole? And can you give us a brief rundown on what happened?

Another point to think about is the fact that Toxic Shock Syndrone was originally linked to synthetic/plastic material used in tampons. The product was removed from the market.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

quickpoint
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by quickpoint » Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:26 pm

Andree? It says it might have been the fault of a suspect stove presumably by a non-ethical greedy supplier :D
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._A._Andr ... _of_deaths

Didn't know the tampon thing, interesting. Generally in the last fifty years cancer has gone from one in five to four to three and NOW they tell us every one of us in two will get it! Niceeeeee. What has changed in the last fifty years? 3 things that cause mutations: 1- Increasing poison in farming/foods (mainly petrochems again), 2- radiation (radio TV and now microwave transmitting dishes plus cell-phone towers and wifi and more to come) and 3- petrochemicals (plastics etc. replacing rubber). Add a fourth to join: GM or genetically modified food. My precautions so far only extend to using the microwave less (oven more) and if so dumping the food into a plate. I guess the plastics are the worst offenders as even in poor and rural countries people are getting more diseases. Once it's heated the leeching goes up exponentially depending on the temperature as you can imagine. So best not bring heat and plastics and food together. It basically starts to dissolve in a plastic lined can into your food. Anyway we are all grown up to make our own choices but most stupid buys and practices are actually by teenagers.

quickpoint
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by quickpoint » Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:32 pm

Just found: lead poisoning on expedition to find the middle part of the Northwest Passage:
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articl ... id=1279489
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Franklin

irrationalsolutions
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by irrationalsolutions » Wed Dec 03, 2008 2:43 pm

i sent a email to ball metal the other day asking about the coating on the inside of the cans. they sent me one back that siad they do not recomend anyone use the cans for any other purpose for food or drink and involves heating. they are one of the larger drink can makers so take it for what its worth but i thought i would share it with you.
“Do or do not... there is NO try.” Yoda

Luke "Whats in (out) there?" Yoda "Only what you take with you."

Luke "I can’t believe it." Yoda "That is why you Fail.”

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zelph
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by zelph » Wed Dec 03, 2008 3:33 pm

Moved here from different thread.

by lostnsp8ce on Wed Dec 03, 2008 2:32 pm

This is a reply to a post on a locked discussion. It has to do with a comment about the lining of steel cans not meant to be heated. They are made to be heated. The temperature may be the issue. Here is a copied sectin from Mealtime.org about the canning process:

The basic principles of canning have not changed dramatically since Nicholas Appert and Peter Durand developed the process. Heat sufficient to destroy microorganisms is applied to foods packed into sealed, or "airtight" containers. The canned foods are then heated under steam pressure at temperatures of 240-250° Fahrenheit (116-121° Celsius). The amount of time needed for processing is different for each food, depending on the food's acidity, density and ability to transfer heat. For example, tomatoes require less time than green beans, while corn and pumpkin require far more time.

Processing conditions are chosen to be the minimum needed to ensure that foods are commercially sterile, but retain the greatest flavor and nutrition. All processes must be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Once the cans are sealed and heat processed, the food maintains its high eating quality for more than two years and is safe to eat as long as the container is not damaged in any way. And, like the home canning process, no preservatives are added or necessary.

The sequence of steps in the canning process differs with the product. Fruits and vegetables may be peeled or pitted, and have stems removed prior to canning. Some vegetables receive a heat treatment before they are placed in the can to remove air and improve packing. (Think about the bulk of raw vs. cooked spinach) Acid juices, like orange and tomato, and acid vegetables, such as sauerkraut, can be sterilized before they are placed into containers. Seafood is usually packed after being boned or shelled, with the exception of smaller fish like sardines and anchovies, or even salmon, which have bones that are softened by heating. Meats and fish, like tuna, are usually cooked to soften the flesh before canning, separated from bones, compacted and placed in cans with appropriate liquid.

One significant difference in the modern canning process is that today's cans are made of 100% recyclable steel.

This is posted for consideration.
Thank You.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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zelph
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by zelph » Wed Dec 03, 2008 3:39 pm

Good info there lostnsp8ce. Do you think you can find us some info on the temperatures they use for the Heineken beer when it's processed? It would be great to have that info. Also the chemicals involved in applying the coating to the can. Is a heat activated epoxy sprayed on or is applied via the lithographic printing process using ultraviolet cured coating (water based?)
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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Ridgerunner
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Re: Plastic Lined Beer Cans as Pots

Post by Ridgerunner » Wed Dec 03, 2008 7:13 pm

Pure Mahem wrote:Oh yeah and I'm positive my new cookpot doesn't have a liner! It's not a beverage can and it's not aluminum, and it is food grade!
Alright PM, you've left us hanging long enought. what are you using for a cookpot these days? Did you break down and buy a titanium pot? :o
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