Do you simmer food on a hike

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Do You simmer

1 Time per week
1
17%
2 times per week
4
67%
1 time every 2 weeks
0
No votes
2 times every 2 weeks
0
No votes
Never
1
17%
 
Total votes: 6

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zelph
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Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by zelph » Fri Apr 30, 2010 10:34 pm

The subject of simmering came up so I think a poll is in order.

Any suggestions on other choices? I'll add it on if so.
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irrationalsolutions
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by irrationalsolutions » Fri Apr 30, 2010 11:00 pm

there really should be a more option. baking would be the same as a simmer so some use it more.

i do when i can. so i picked the option that offered the most.
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Albert Skye
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by Albert Skye » Fri Apr 30, 2010 11:07 pm

For me, it depends on what I'm cooking.

Some things (like taro, breadfruit, &c.) need to cook for a long time.

I should add that I generally aim to find food as I go (which may or may not need simmering). Also, the food I carry for long distances does not need simmering or even boiling (i.e., it's precooked and dehydrated, soak'n'eat ;)).
Last edited by Albert Skye on Sat May 01, 2010 2:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

realityguy
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by realityguy » Sat May 01, 2010 12:55 am

I want a stove that simmers every time because I use it for other purposes besides 'simmering'...baking,cooking eggs and pancakes,cooking fish,etc..etc...
I think your "time factors" don't really make sense "once a week?"..Title:Do you simmer food on a hike..."do you hike once a week? :?:
Why not "every backpacking trip".."every other trip".."once in a great while"..or "NEVER!I like to burn the crap out of everything." :lol:
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ConnieD
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by ConnieD » Sat May 01, 2010 3:04 am

I agree with him.

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zelph
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by zelph » Sat May 01, 2010 9:31 am

Ok....we need a new poll started. I tried to revise the existing one but failed.(learning curve here, first try at a poll.

irrationalsolutions, here's your chance.........start a new thread..............click on new topic and see the little "poll" box on the lower left side, follow instructions and create according to suggestions.
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Ridgerunner
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by Ridgerunner » Sat May 01, 2010 8:46 pm

I want a stove that simmers every time because I use it for other purposes besides 'simmering'
I agree with Cuz ;) I want a stove that will boil water lickity split or simmer if I want it to. I'm thinking the new SS will be the solution ! :mrgreen:
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realityguy
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by realityguy » Sat May 01, 2010 11:27 pm

The OTHER Cuz is the brown-nosed one.. That's how you can tell us apart. ;)


:lol:
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ConnieD
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by ConnieD » Sun May 02, 2010 12:13 am

The problem determining what is a "simmer" may be solved with a remote sensing temperature probe.

In cooking, you "simmer" after bringing to a boil: the "simmer" is bubbles still rise to the top breaking the surface. However, these are the minimum maintained by the lowest temperature. This is part of the reason many "cooks" like to cook on a gas flame. The electric range top is just too slow to adjust heat delivered to the pot or to the pan.

This is probably dependent on the volume of water, soup, but, it is always a wet-recipe, which brings us to the other "simmer". This "simmer" is for reduction of a sauce and may be in a sauce pan, especially, as sloping side sauce pan or a saute pan.

I am not a Cordon Bleu chef. I am only saying, there are two different purposes for a "simmer". In one, you do not want the pot to boil over but you do want to maintain the temperature of what is in the cooking pot. In the other, you want to have maximum surface for the purpose of evaporation to reduce and intensify the flavor of the broth or of the sauce, and you "simmer" to speed things along. I would say 120-180 F will "simmer".

Does that help?

I also lift the pan higher off the flame, to "simmer" and to avoid burning food.

At those moments, I wish I had a higher pot stand. In practicality, I would rather have a "lower flame" because the breezes outdoors may make no heat reach the cooking pan or pot.

When I first considered this problem, I thought I would have two alcohol stoves: a "simmer stove" and a "Hot stove". I liked the Ion for my "simmer" stove, but about that time Sgt. Rock had stopped making the Ion stove and I missed out. I was looking for the "Hot stove" when I found zElph.

realityguy
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Re: Do you simmer food on a hike

Post by realityguy » Sun May 02, 2010 1:12 am

The secret to a good simmer mode is to get to know your stove and what it takes to make it simmer at the heat setting you require for the task at hand(and current conditions),whether it's an additional part of the stove or a stove made for more than one mode of cooking.I make only two stage stoves(boil/simmer)for trail use because I need the additional adjustments in my cooking while hiking,no additional parts needed.My stoves are made to burn at the temperatures I desire in the field when I need them.
If you stay with one fuel source(den.alcohol,heet,meths,iso.alcohol)you'll know what it will do and what to expect from a stove.Design it for what is needed,or use the fuel that will make the "modes" you require possible..maybe even using diluted fuel.A good many alcohol type stove designs can be made to simmer one way or another and at a pretty steady temperature.You just have to figure out how to get that.
Stove heat output once in a simmer mode can be adjusted by the windscreen or other methods.As you said JT,add a heat vent to remove excess heat from the stove or within the pot itself.I occasionally just add something under the edge of the lid,a curtain hook,or even a stick to allow more heat to escape when needed.To increase the heat a little,tighten up the windscreen,adjust the pot to stove distance or whatever it takes.
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

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