wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

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zelph
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by zelph » Sat Jan 28, 2012 2:58 pm

It was another 6hrs before anyone else got there. I think it would be good to learn what kind of fire you could start using only the palms of your hands. My guess is a lot of casual hikers/hunters would re-think their fire kit.
Glad you made it through that scary experience :D
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sudden
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by sudden » Sat Jan 28, 2012 3:40 pm

Funny thing is it wasn't scary at all. That fuzzy thinking connied is talking about makes you very mellow. I kept resting against trees on the way out thinking about how nice it would be to just lie down and take a nap. I knew what was happening but that feeling just stays with you and you have to fight it. I imagine people who freeze to death are very much at peace in the end.
"People are not persuaded by what we say, but rather by what they understand."

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ConnieD
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by ConnieD » Sat Jan 28, 2012 5:01 pm

I think if people learned all about hypothermia, with preventing hypothermia the goal, maybe most problems out-of-doors would not happen.

In my website, I deal with gear and clothing and knowledge that protect against hypothermia.

I don't directly mention hypothermia, except in few places.

The theme, however, runs through my entire website. Be comfortable, have a good time in the outdoors.

I know actuarial science for insurance purposes, shows more people are killed in their own, or their neighbor's, swimming pool than are killed by guns, much less, by a wild animal or anything "in the wild".

Unreasoning fear, is not justified.

Maybe a "positive approach" is to teach people about prevention of hypothermia?

People may get lost and find their way or be rescued, but the "risk" is hypothermia.

I know, if and when my fingers are clumsy, is not the time to use a knife, an axe, or "make decisions".

I have to know what to do, and do it.

Arson
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by Arson » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:21 pm

I just did an update to my medical kit. It's good to get that stuff out once in a while and make sure it still fits your needs.


realityguy
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by realityguy » Sun Jan 29, 2012 2:37 pm

I'm assuming you pack some sunscreen..,.and that ukulele in the corner.. I would..:roll: :lol:
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zelph
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by zelph » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:29 pm

I had to post this before going further. I emphasized the first fact in bold type:

Symptoms
By Mayo Clinic staff

Shivering is your body's automatic defense against cold temperature — an attempt to warm itself. Constant shivering is a key sign of hypothermia.
Signs and symptoms of moderate to severe hypothermia include:

Shivering
Clumsiness or lack of coordination
Slurred speech or mumbling
Stumbling
Confusion or difficulty thinking
Poor decision making, such as trying to remove warm clothes
Drowsiness or very low energy
Apathy or lack of concern about one's condition
Progressive loss of consciousness
Weak pulse
Slow, shallow breathing
A person with hypothermia usually isn't aware of his or her condition, because the symptoms often begin gradually and because the confused thinking associated with hypothermia prevents self-awareness.
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ConnieD
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by ConnieD » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:43 pm

I think the most important "wilderness survival/outdoor first aid" is don't allow yourself to get hypothermia. Hypothermia isn't something you ignore because you think you are "a tough guy".

If you start to have a symptom, or, have a symptom, take action to recover.

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zelph
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by zelph » Sun Jan 29, 2012 10:04 pm

ConnieD wrote:I think the most important "wilderness survival/outdoor first aid" is don't allow yourself to get hypothermia. Hypothermia isn't something you ignore because you think you are "a tough guy".

If you start to have a symptom, or, have a symptom, take action to recover.
Accidents happen when we least expect it. Be prepared to know what to do when they happen.

I had hypothermia under 60 degree temperatures at home. I had gotten a good case of food poisoning, became dehydrated, felt so ill and tired I fell asleep on the floor near the bathroom. Woke up shivering uncontrollably. I could not force myself to stop shivering. I was fully aware of the seriousness of the situation. I became aware of how difficult it would be in the outdoors/woods hiking and had gotten sick. I would not have been able to scrape my magnesium bar to get enough to start a fire. I don't think I could have made the thumb wheel on a butane lighter turn.

I read where someone died in a wilderness cabin of hypothermia. There was a box of wooden matches on the table and plenty of firewood inside. I'll google and see if I can find the story.
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catspa
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by catspa » Sun Jan 29, 2012 10:19 pm

A person with hypothermia usually isn't aware of his or her condition, because the symptoms often begin gradually and because the confused thinking associated with hypothermia prevents self-awareness.

I've seen this a lot, and been grateful for good teammates who could see it in me. Caught early, hypothermia is pretty easy to address, and once warmed up a person can continue as before, and still function well.

I have something to confess concerning firestarting method, though. <hangs head sheepishly, scuffs toe in dirt> I cheat. When I need a fire RFN, no fooling around, without regard for wetness of fuel or other nonsense, I light a road flare and stuff it under whatever wood I've got. It's a stinky, smoky fire but if fuel will burn at all, a road flare will light it off. (I also carry other fire methods for times when the urgency isn't so great.)

Parker

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ConnieD
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Re: wilderness survival/outdoor first aid

Post by ConnieD » Mon Jan 30, 2012 3:22 am

:| I was going to say it, but I was too afraid to say it.

I have a 2-part chemical that will burn: put Part A (powder) on combustible material, put Part B (liquid) on.
Stand back. This one involves opening screw top small glass bottles I keep in two large screw-top sealed separate containers.

Hunters use road flares.

Kayakers use safety flares. I have one left: Skyblazer Hotshot Fire Starter.

Skyblazer Hotshot Fire Starter is also sold in "survival kits" kits to pilots.

I got it a West Marine hardware on the coast.

Still, you have to scratch the "lighter pad" holding it facing away from you and toss it on the combustable materials you have prepared.

I was looking at another "product" only yesterday... Fire Puck Matchless Fire Starter.

This product is available at Home Depot. It may be safer and easier to use.

You still have to prepare the materials you will use for the fire.

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