Hot Candy Heater

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Abela
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Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 7:04 pm
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Hot Candy Heater

Post by Abela » Sun Jul 13, 2014 6:47 am

Hey Dan,

Not sure if you have seen one of these, but this is just such a cute little thing. I would totally buy one if it wasn't $65 freaking dollars. Sure it is worth that price based on the work it probably takes, but still in the "ouch" price range for me.

http://store.picharpak.com/index.php?ro ... duct_id=70

Hope all is going good for you Dan.

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zelph
Posts: 15834
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: Hot Candy Heater

Post by zelph » Sun Jul 13, 2014 1:19 pm

Nice looking mini heater. Thanks for bringing it here for us to see and wonder how it's made :D

I wonder how long you have to pre-heat it by holding it over the flames of the Trangia before setting it down onto the stove. Yes, I'm assuming...... ;) it will snuff out the trangia if it's put on too soon.

I suspect the red hot coils help burn the fuel more efficiently like the coils on a kerosene heater.

I found some good photos of it:
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http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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zelph
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Re: Hot Candy Heater

Post by zelph » Sun Jul 13, 2014 2:37 pm

Heating a perforated object was of interest in past experiments. concentrating flames on the bottom of pots was also being pursued.
zelph wrote:This little burner got its name from the shape of its flame pattern.

I'm just playing around with this idea, it's not going anywhere yet.

Flame Pattern Flame is 6 inches high from top of tin to tip of flame


I tried it out on a Heineken pot, it has a bottom that is concave and it lends itself just right for the height of the burner and pot stand.

Boiled 2 cups of water using 1/2 ounce of fuel under ideal kitchen conditions. Did not time it. Did not weigh it. Still under construction.

The cone shaped generator is made of stainless steel. Gets red hot and I suspect it may be aiding in efficiency of the fuel consumed as it passes through it. Venturi effect may be present to increase veloscity of heat impinging upon small concave bottom of pot, I don't know.

Its base is made of aluminum tins(2) stuffed with cotton. Cotton gets consumed if let to burn. Blow it out before fuel gets low and the cotton will last longer.



The top of the red colored tin to the tip of the flame was 6 inches and when unrestricted it moves fast like a propane torch(not that fast ) but fast. I've used aluminum in the past but it deteriorated quicly because of the heat generated. The photos show the stainless red hot, aluminum melts easily once it reaches the red stage. A finer mesh would not work as well, it would restrict oxygen. I'm inclined to go higher not shorter for more drafting and speed. This is just something for stovies to play with, a mini caldera type gizmo. DWM is probably scratching his head, shaking it and saying whats with the cone stuff . We stovenerds have fun


I'm not really sure whats going on with this devise, maybe losing some there but gaining heat retention inside the pot. Something out of the ordinary happening inside the pot. When the water temp is around 200, the water begins to boil in an area the size of the pinpoint flame(size of a nickle) large boiling size bubbles are coming up the center of the pot in a column.

The photos show the flames being shmoshed when hitting the bottom of the pot, but as the flame calms down it gets more focused and seems to really zap a small area.

The fuel tin only has a 3/4 inch hole in the center. Under normal conditions the flame is only 2 1/2 in. max.

The cone is small, but packs a pretty good consentrated punch. Boil time decreased by 3/4 min. maybe its the Venturi syndrone.
When the stainless cone becomes red hot it has probably absorbed as much heat as it can and then does it aid in complete combustion of the vapors that pass through it? When the burner runs out of fuel does the latent heat in the cone given off go upwards to continue to heat the pot/water? How many times have we gotten sidetracted only to come back to our stove and the fuel has run out and our ramen noodles are patiently waiting for us to get our act together and proceed with dinner? All things considered, I think 1/2 ounce of fuel does ok for itself. There are a few of use that know the capabilities of the 1/2 ounce of fuel. How many of us are concerned about the flames going up the side of the pot reducing the efficiency of the stove? We get overly concerned about keeping the flame only under the pot, this thread is for those that are in that mind set. This info will help someone in their research.

Now we can take this design one step further and add another element. A POT designed to capture heat in its center. We have a burner that might just do what we want the pot to do. The "Cone of Fire" fits well into the pot cone. DWM is shaking his head again , another cone thing?

These photos will give some idea of what might be possible if perfected. These items that you see are experimental for testing theories. We can speculate at this point what may come about after the testing is done. The pot with the hole in the middle is not my idea, when I go back into a thread and find the info I'll post his name and give him the credit. The pot that you see in the photos holds 4 cups of water. The pots central cone does'nt have a hole in it and will be tested in that fashion first. Heat will be introduced into the cone from the bottom and will flow up and down and out to the bottom of the pot and then flow outward to the sides of the pot.

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1)Some of the heat energy generated is absorbed into the cone and becomes unusable by the pot.
2) However, this will aid in complete combustion of the fuel before it gets around the outside of the bottom of pot (realize, anytime you see visible flame there is an invisible area around it that is still combusting some of the uncombusted fuel, the vivisble area is just where a LOT of, some of it incomplete, combustion going on)
3) The cone apears to be focusing the heat "like a laser" on the center of the bottom of the pot. This is very good because any heated gasses on the sides of the pot can only impart about 1/2 their potential heating to the pot (because the other side of the gas stream is heating air)

When the stainless cone becomes red hot it has probably absorbed as much heat as it can and then does it aid in complete combustion of the vapors that pass through it? When the burner runs out of fuel does the latent heat in the cone given off go upwards to continue to heat the pot/water? How many times have we gotten sidetracted only to come back to our stove and the fuel has run out and our ramen noodles are patiently waiting for us to get our act together and proceed with dinner? All things considered, I think 1/2 ounce of fuel does ok for itself. There are a few of use that know the capabilities of the 1/2 ounce of fuel. How many of us are concerned about the flames going up the side of the pot reducing the efficiency of the stove? We get overly concerned about keeping the flame only under the pot, this thread is for those that are in that mind set. This info will help someone in their research.


The great thing about the pudding pan is no hole in the center, just a place for the heat to be forced up into and then it will come back down and drop off some of its heat on the walls of the cone and then come down a little more and flow over the bottom of the pot dropping off some more heat. Then the heat starts up the sides of the pot and as long as we dont have a pot cozy on the pot, some of the heat will be absorbed by the aluminum and transfered to the water inside the pot. Three places to absorb heat.

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http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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