Split Wood

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zelph
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Split Wood

Post by zelph » Sat Nov 22, 2008 8:17 pm

Split some wood today, warmed me up again :D

If at first you don't succeed, try again :lol: :lol: :lol:

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oops56
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Re: Split Wood

Post by oops56 » Sat Nov 22, 2008 8:21 pm

I did the same thing today but if you wait till it freeze lot easily
Man play with fire man get burnt

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zelph
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Re: Split Wood

Post by zelph » Sat Nov 22, 2008 8:40 pm

oops56 wrote:I did the same thing today but if you wait till it freeze lot easily
We've had below freezing temps for the past three days. Most of the wood split easy with a nice crisp craaack!!! :D

Lot's of geese flying south today, good day to be out to see them in huge formations.
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oops56
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Re: Split Wood

Post by oops56 » Sat Nov 22, 2008 8:54 pm

zelph wrote:
oops56 wrote:I did the same thing today but if you wait till it freeze lot easily
We've had below freezing temps for the past three days. Most of the wood split easy with a nice crisp craaack!!! :D

Lot's of geese flying south today, good day to be out to see them in huge formations.
Well mine was soft wood swamp ash used a axe
Man play with fire man get burnt

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zelph
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Re: Split Wood

Post by zelph » Sun Nov 23, 2008 11:16 am

The stuff i was splitting was 3 year seasond well boxelder :) Some was black locust, tough as nails :mrgreen:
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GAGA
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Re: Split Wood

Post by GAGA » Sun Nov 23, 2008 12:25 pm

splitting wood is very relaxing to me,i do it everyday at work, on a smaller scale ,but splitting the"Big Boys" is pure mental therapy
you can pay for school,but you can never buy class!

hoz
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Re: Split Wood

Post by hoz » Sun Nov 23, 2008 4:25 pm

zelph wrote:The stuff i was splitting was 3 year seasond well boxelder :) Some was black locust, tough as nails :mrgreen:
I used to live in a 100 yr old farmhouse out in the country. The walls were filled with sawdust sometime back in the early 1900's but it had prolly settled long before we moved in. With propane gas as high as it was, and the house not suited for electric heat I used wood and coal for several years.

Some of my best memories are of my son and me out cutting, chopping and splitting wood, filling the stove and watching it get red hot then banking the stove for the night. Shaking it down in the morning, carrying out the ashes to spread on the gravel drive and then starting all over again, wait...did I say BEST memories ????

Lots of work, but worthwhile. I always thought locust was some of the best heating wood BTW. Burned like coal.

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zelph
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Re: Split Wood

Post by zelph » Sun Nov 23, 2008 7:14 pm

hoz wrote:
zelph wrote:The stuff i was splitting was 3 year seasond well boxelder :) Some was black locust, tough as nails :mrgreen:
I used to live in a 100 yr old farmhouse out in the country. The walls were filled with sawdust sometime back in the early 1900's but it had prolly settled long before we moved in. With propane gas as high as it was, and the house not suited for electric heat I used wood and coal for several years.

Some of my best memories are of my son and me out cutting, chopping and splitting wood, filling the stove and watching it get red hot then banking the stove for the night. Shaking it down in the morning, carrying out the ashes to spread on the gravel drive and then starting all over again, wait...did I say BEST memories ????

Lots of work, but worthwhile. I always thought locust was some of the best heating wood BTW. Burned like coal.
My house is approx. 150 years old, has lots of character :D Framing is 2" X 4" oak. It's no wonder the lath needed forge hardened nails to penetrate the oak. Lot's of memories in old homes. My house was the first house that travelers came to that had a hand dug well to water their horses. Has a hand dug cystern where cans of milk were kept overnight on their way into town. The owner was a delivery man for local dairy farms. Lots of stories, lots of history.

You're right about the locust burning like coal :)
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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