At-home cooking

Odds and Ends Of Life, Keep It Clean
churro
Posts: 208
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:00 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Thu Mar 19, 2015 5:35 am

It's 3:30 and I can't sleep. For some reason I find myself thinking covetously of Zelph's bread machine. If I'd known you could bake other stuff in one, I would have gotten one long ago. I might have to hunt up a used one to experiment with.

User avatar
zelph
Posts: 15822
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby zelph » Thu Mar 19, 2015 9:40 am

That's too funny :D

Most bread machines don't have a "bake only" feature. That info comes from a friend that hunts for them at thrift stores. She bakes regularly and is in constant search for the "ultimate" bread machine. She rarely pays more than 10 bucks at thrift stores. My wife agrees also that it's rare to find one with the bake feature.

Today I will buy a roasting chicken and see how well it does in the machine.

I hope you have good luck in finding a baker machine :D

After your chores are done, take a nap :mrgreen:
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

User avatar
zelph
Posts: 15822
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby zelph » Thu Mar 19, 2015 10:24 pm

Cooked a frying size chicken cut up. I was going to get a whole chicken but passed on the idea. Thought it would stick up to high. cooked it for 3 hrs. That was too much, could have done it with 2.5hrs. Really cooked a lot of oils out of it.
Machine needed no cleaning. No splatter or condensation. The air circulation is awesome to get rid of moisture.

That's a big pile of meat on that plate and was so easy to cook. :dinner:
Attachments
frying chicken 005.JPG
frying chicken 004.JPG
frying chicken 002.JPG
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

churro
Posts: 208
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:00 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Fri Mar 20, 2015 9:45 am

Looks good! Thanks for reminding me to thaw some game hens.

User avatar
Ridgerunner
Posts: 5275
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:08 pm
Location: SW, Ohio
Contact:

Re: At-home cooking

Postby Ridgerunner » Sat Mar 21, 2015 12:43 pm

Well Zelph; I'm not sure if this is the model bread maker you have but when I saw it at a church sale this morning and saw it had a rectangular loaf pan, I thought for $5 that I might give it a try :lol:
Image
"Many of lifes failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up".....Thomas Edison

"Live Life....Love Life....Ask More !

User avatar
Ridgerunner
Posts: 5275
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:08 pm
Location: SW, Ohio
Contact:

Re: At-home cooking

Postby Ridgerunner » Sat Mar 21, 2015 9:32 pm

Have you tried making a meatloaf with the bread maker? I'm thinking a rack of sorts in the bottom to keep your meat from sitting in their oils :idea:
"Many of lifes failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up".....Thomas Edison

"Live Life....Love Life....Ask More !

churro
Posts: 208
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:00 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Sat Mar 21, 2015 10:07 pm

Nice find, Ridgerunner. Hope you like it. I'm still looking... :(

Here's one that's more of a method than a recipe, but I use it at home or on the trail. The ingredients are variable, for the most part, but it has always ended up good. It's best if you have gathered some wild stuff, like wild parsley, onions, lambs quarter, miner's lettuce, dandelion, spring beauties, whatever you know and like. Tonight I used some dried cabbage, dried mushrooms, dried tomatoes, dried beans (cooked, then dried, so they just have to be re-hydrated) and fresh baby spinach. I am trying to use up camp food that is a year old. If you use carrots, spring beauties, thistle root, wild parsley roots, or other roots, slice them thin and add with the noodles. Just be careful to positively idetify wild edibles, and don't use them up. I gather stuff that is common, leaving at least 6 plants for every one I take.

Pour some boiling water over any dehydrated ingredients and set aside. Make sure it's enough to re-hydrate, and then some. Then bring 2 cans of chicken stock to a boil (or prepare some stock from cubes or powder). Add some sliced garlic (dried is ok) and some sliced ginger (use fresh- it keeps well on the trail) and some dried onions (or fresh- like I said- a method, not a recipe) and some spaghetti noodles, broken into 3" sections (these can be pre-cooked and dried for faster cooking, or just use ramen). I usually add some really good New Mexico chile powder we get from a friend in Santa Fe. When the noodles are almost ready add the re-hydrated ingredients, along with the liquid. Simmer until the noodles are done. Increase the heat and add 1-2 beaten eggs (if available) and stir. Add any fresh greens and some dried korean wasabe flavored seaweed and stir. Remove from heat. Season to taste and eat, or (ideally) add new england nuoc mam to taste (see one of the previous posts- also seems to keep ok for a couple days on the trail) and eat. This will feed 3-4, so it could be increased or cut back to suit your needs. On the trail, ramen noodles work best.

This stuff has always rivaled the best hot and sour soup I have ever had, regardless of what combination of vegetables I have used. Delicious!

User avatar
Ridgerunner
Posts: 5275
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:08 pm
Location: SW, Ohio
Contact:

Re: At-home cooking

Postby Ridgerunner » Sat Mar 21, 2015 10:45 pm

Churro, I have never dried cabbage. How well does it rehydrate and hold it's texture?
"Many of lifes failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up".....Thomas Edison

"Live Life....Love Life....Ask More !

User avatar
zelph
Posts: 15822
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby zelph » Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:19 pm

Ridgerunner wrote:Well Zelph; I'm not sure if this is the model bread maker you have but when I saw it at a church sale this morning and saw it had a rectangular loaf pan, I thought for $5 that I might give it a try :lol:
]


yes, yes, yes....same model whoooo $5.00 you did well!!! :D

I made ground beef meat loaf and it had maybe 1/2" liquid on bottom of pot to keep it moist.

This is a photo of the bottom of the loaf:
Attachments
meatloaf tomato seeds 003.JPG
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

User avatar
zelph
Posts: 15822
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby zelph » Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:26 pm

I am trying to use up camp food that is a year old. If you use carrots, spring beauties, thistle root, wild parsley roots, or other roots, slice them thin and add with the noodles. Just be careful to positively idetify wild edibles, and don't use them up. I gather stuff that is common, leaving at least 6 plants for every one I take.


Churro, how did you get interested in wild edibles?

I know how to identify most of the plants you list, so now to go out this spring and get some to try. :D
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/


Return to “Just For The Fun Of It”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest