Page 2 of 3

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 7:49 pm
by realityguy
Took the bottom off the new balance one..appears it's 3 layers! :o There's another one behind the rubber holes. I might have to torch the thing to get it apart..whiich might make a molten rubber mess..oh well..I've run into construction with hot glue before..hopefully it's the same way and will melt apart before the rubber gets burning..
That french press one is a goodie(new about $30)..somewhere recently we had another thread(coffee one??) on one of those I hacked down it to the smaller french press(and have a second smaller lighter pot for the press also)..Since it is a single layer,now,I can heat water in its pot..pour the coffee,milk in and use the press lid,drink out of the press lid.I left the upper double rim for not burning your lip and we just wrap a towel around the rest to drink out of it.

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 7:57 pm
by cadyak
I just kind of grab the plastic parts in one hand and the steel in the other and twist. some of them have a spot welded plate of lighter gage metal on the bottom. I drill a starter hole and then use tin snips to cut over to the edge till the pieces pop off. Under that there is usually a flat rim that can be cut out or bent up in tabs for a pot stand.
This twist test is now my criteria for whether a mug is nice enough to remain just a mug.
If I cant pull it apart, then it stays a mug. (for now)

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:01 pm
by cadyak
Also, if its really hard to push the cup out from the bottom then you can cut the grippies off as best you can on the outside with a razor knife. Just slide the knife vertically in one sweep. It makes it easier to slide the cup out.

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:37 pm
by realityguy
Turns out it was just the rubber layer I was looking at..no third layer.I heated the whole thing up with the bumble bee salmon can stove and tapped on the bottom of the cup..eventually it popped out.Pried on the rubber until it finally came out.I bent a small piece of wire across to hold the cup above a small stove in there and to give it a bit of breathing room around the cup--->

Image

I got the support wire a bit crooked in the holes(while it was hot..oh well)..why the cup is sitting crooked but it's easy to adjust it above the stoves(before it gets hot).
Tried a two stage stove,didn't want to take off..then a couple others.I didn't try the budlyte which might work.Ended up with a wedding favor one (starlyte style) that seemed to burn the best.I think the open pan/wicking material stoves might be the best bet for making coffee for me in that setup.
I don't really plan on burning wood until next year so probably will just use it for coffee with the 12oz cup and alcohol until then.I won't be doing anything but day hikes for a while...

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Wed Dec 16, 2009 11:25 am
by zelph
The stove in the middle with the flared base, did you add the base or did it come off the shelf that way? Looks nice and stable :D

Once in a while I'll find a "Milkshake" container, stainless steel, commercial type that looks great for a wood burner. I have one or two somwhere, have not seen them lately :roll:

RG, you didn't let any grass grow under your feet, nice first try at making the stove. Keep an eye open for more containers :D

Image

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Wed Dec 16, 2009 4:48 pm
by cadyak
That is a thin stainless plate from a kids picnic set. I cut out a hole to fit and it snaps on there real well. I am experimenting with ways to nest it. I flip it upside down and slide it down tight over the top for now. That is the very first one I made and one of my favorites. You can put a LOT of wood in there. Including 6" long pieces if you top load it too. It is definitely stable. It is also the one kind that a local retailer sells. Yes I must admit I have paid for a few, but I am making christmas presents for relatives and I kind of wanted them to be similar in function.

I have found that most are really stable without an additional base due to their shape and the bottom pan. Or go without the pan and just set the bottom ring of the stove on the ground and twist it in a little. (where allowed)

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 12:22 pm
by cadyak
Here is my backup stove setup for a few of the 16oz FIREMUGs. Zelph was nice enough to let me test one of the few top jetted cobalt stoves that he created. It works great. I am hoping to convince him to make more of them. It seems to work better than anything else because the flame pattern is directed slightly inward giving it more room in the skinny neck of the fire mug.

Image

The stove stores inside of the potstand. It is tapered slightly on one end so if you flip it over, it fits plenty tightly enough to become a stove stand inside the mug. I have found this to be an extremely stable setup that is very wind resistant. I can use an additional small windscreen which I normally carry anyway for really nasty conditions. I use thin stainless stakes to stake the whole stove down which makes it so stable that you cant even kick it over.

Image

Image

Image

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 4:39 pm
by zelph
Wish I had time to make one :D I can picture me sitting cross legged next to the stove feeding it and watching the flames dance under my pot. And to have the cobalt as an alchy back up, nice combination, looks like it burns nice where you've positioned it. I could be convinced to make the top jetted ones :D Nice photos and video, thank you!!!

I'll have to start looking for some mugs to transform into a stove. I like your designs, looks like fun.....I need spare time :o

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 8:32 pm
by Ridgerunner
Nice pics ofyour setup, cadyak!

Re: The Fire Mug

Posted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:03 pm
by zelph
I almost bought a small stainless pitcher to make one, thrift store, 59 cents, about 9" tall X 4" dia. It was a little bit heavier than I wanted, too hard to cut. I'm looking!!!!!!!! :D