Page 1 of 2

Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 5:05 pm
by zelph
In the last two months I've noticed on a few forums in their gear for sale forum there have been wood stoves for sale. Makes me wonder why they buy them in the first place. Is it because of the pre-hype that goes on by forum members as they receive their stove in the mail and go on a big whoop-tee-do on how great the stove is when they haven't even used it yet.

I remember when Backpackinglight.com starting preping the members about how R.Jordan got everyone there excited when he announce that he would be selling the Bushbuddy. He had contracted to have the BB made to his specs so it would be lightweight.

So time goes by and one of RJordans head guys is selling his BB saying is was used slightly.
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin ... d_id=74748

Another hot item was the Backcountry Boiler.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin ... d_id=74745

Makes me wonder if folks out there think there's somthing magic about stoves that will occur and make them have an ejoyable wood burn that will heat their water.

I purchased a Backcountry Boiler used on BPL to see what the big deal was. (I had 3 kellykettles at the time) I tested it only to find out the fire bowl was too small and it was tapered that made me feel the whole kettle was not stable. So, I bought one just to test it. :D

I'll be back with a link to an older sale.

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 5:22 pm
by zelph

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2013 12:49 pm
by steamjam
I originally experimented with wood gas stoves to have an alternative stove that I can use out traveling incase I ran out of, or otherwise lost the liquid fuel. I thought about a Bush Buddy, and the Back country broiler, but chose the Wildstove instead because its collapsible, fits within the small MSR pot, and can be used with a Trangia alcohol stove. Its the only wood-gas stove I found that tucks neatly inside the metal tool carrier (No tools in it now, just emergency supplies) which lives attached to the back of the spare tire of my beetle.

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2013 5:57 pm
by zelph
After seeing a size comparison photo of the 2 stoves side by side I really can understand why you chose the wildstove and would want to hang onto it.

Bushbuddy on the left and Wildstove on the right.

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:31 pm
by steamjam
zelph wrote:After seeing a size comparison photo of the 2 stoves side by side I really can understand why you chose the wildstove and would want to hang onto it.

Bushbuddy on the left and Wildstove on the right.
Yeah. The Wildstove collapses into about half the size of the Bush Buddy.

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 7:22 pm
by zelph
Right, wish I coulda found a photo showing all three to include the collapse. I'll try to locateone.

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 6:22 pm
by cadyak
You have to love woodfires and all things that come with them. :D
Enough to deal with:
a little soot, a few extra minutes of preparation, wet wood, and a few nicks to the hands every once in a while. The skills that you learn from building a woodstove fire can help build a campfire in any conditions.

To me it seems silly to carry a wood stove (inherently larger, heavier than an alcohol stove) as a "back-up stove". Not that it matters a hoot but IF you are going to carry a woodstove, it makes more sense to think of it as your main stove and the smaller, lighter, more packable alcohol stove as your backup.

Picking up twigs during the day and snapping them to test for dryness familiarizes you with the wood in the area and to me is one of the more fun aspects of walking all day through a wooded area. In less than ideal wet weather conditions at the end of each day I end up with a small sack full of fuel (smaller than softball sized)
There are some very high dollar woodstoves out there and many of them work just fine. I suspect the the reason that many of them are sold is that folks just dont have the "love" :lol:
I will almost always make a campfire if it is legal at a camp. Some of my hiking partners have stated that it is a waste of energy and time (they call me the firemaster) but I notice that they will always end up warming themselves and hanging by the fire if there is one. :geek:

on top of Mt Sterling. 18deg F at dusk and snowing...
Image

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Wed Apr 17, 2013 9:36 pm
by zelph
Nice eye candy photo there Brent. I kinda drifted off there a bit watching the flame stand still :lol: It just sat there and it nothing but still made me start day dreaming of my last campfire. :D

I use my folding woodgaz stove for cooking and campfire for warming and making me sleepy :D

The woodgaz has the capacity for 4 cups of water. 2 cups for food and 2 cups to drink. during the course of the evening I reload the woodgaz for my morning water needs. In the morning all I have to do is light the stove and put the pot on. I've got the whole process down to a science :D

I can see your buddies will partake in the fruits of your labor while they move closer to the fire in those cold temps.

Thanks for that warming photo :mrgreen:

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 9:28 am
by cadyak
I guess the Woodgaz stove would really count since it folds flat. You could always have it in your pack without taking up any space. Excellent "backup stove" :D

Re: Why buy a wood burning stove?

Posted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 9:29 pm
by zelph
A kelly kettle fits on top of a folding woodgaz. No need for the base that comes with the kettle. You can place the kettle right next to your nice campfire and heat water by radiant energy. You can get 2 cups to boil in 2 min. next to your fire in the photo. :D Use a companion burner for alcohol on days when wood is soaked.

Got an email recently from someone that says he uses a StarLyte Burner with the pot support from his Bush Buddy wood burner. Just put the pot support on the ground and the burner inside and away you go.